'Putin Has Restored Sense of Might in His Foreign Policy' THE BRIEFING

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), September 7, 2013 | Go to article overview

'Putin Has Restored Sense of Might in His Foreign Policy' THE BRIEFING


Byline: Graham Henry

VLADIMIR PUTIN has long been caricatured in the West as a belligerent dictator to his own people - and an increasingly combative, recalcitrant child on the international stage.

His official spokesman's reported comments brushing aside Britain's level of influence on the rest of the world are not out of character and reveal even more about Russia's lingering sense of insecurity on the world stage than it does about the UK's diminishing role.

Here's a country of 143 million when once it was the centre of an empire of 291 million. It has dragged itself through the ignominy of the Yeltsin years and lurching from one economic disaster to another, to a place of (relative) stability under Putin - and the Russian people remain largely grateful for it.

Therein lies the rub in dealing with a Putin 14 years on from ascending to lead Russia.

He's got 14 years of perceived success behind him - whether as President or Prime Minister - and remains overwhelmingly popular with the public at large with approval ratings permanently above 60% since he entered office.

Living in St Petersburg (Putin's birthplace incidentally) in 2007, I lived through a similar example of how Russia's relationship with the UK can hit the kerb, when the tantrums start and sparks fly.

I was working as an interpreter and teacher for the British Council, a few months after the suspected murder of spy defector Alexander Litvinenko by a Russian agent.

As Russia refused to extradite the main suspect, Andrey Lugovoy, the fallout from it was spectacular.

Diplomats were expelled, snide remarks were exchanged between senior ministers, amid the forced closure of all British Council offices outside Moscow, including a lightning-strike closure of our own - ostensibly for tax evasion, but it was immediately clear that it was because Russian officials regarded it as a cover for something more sinister. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Putin Has Restored Sense of Might in His Foreign Policy' THE BRIEFING
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.