America Dreaming: The Horrors of Segregation Bound the US Civil Rights Movement Together. Fifty Years on from Martin Luther King's Great Speech, Inequality Persists-But in Subtler Ways

By Younge, Gary | New Statesman (1996), August 23, 2013 | Go to article overview

America Dreaming: The Horrors of Segregation Bound the US Civil Rights Movement Together. Fifty Years on from Martin Luther King's Great Speech, Inequality Persists-But in Subtler Ways


Younge, Gary, New Statesman (1996)


In 1955, Emmett Till was fished out of the Tallahatchie River in Mississippi with a bullet in his skull, an eye gouged out and his forehead crushed on one side after the 14-year-old had said, "Bye, baby," to a white woman in a grocery store. Everybody knew who did it. The two men admitted it afterwards. But it took an all-white jury just 67 minutes to return a verdict of not guilty. One of the jurors said they would have returned earlier if they hadn't stopped for a soda.

Eight years later the Mississippi civil rights worker Medgar Evers was returning home just after midnight carrying white T-shirts announcing "Jim Crow Must Go". Across the street, Byron De La Beckwith, a Klansman, was lurking in the honeysuckle bushes with a 30.06 Enfield hunting rifle. The sound of Evers slamming the car door was followed rapidly by a burst of gunfire. By the time Evers's wife, Myrlie, got to the front door her husband was already dying. Everyone knew Beckwith had done it. But it wasn't until 1994 he was convicted, after all-white juries twice failed to reach a verdict.

On the night in July when George Zimmerman was acquitted of murdering Trayvon Martin, the Martin family's lawyer sought to locate Trayvon's plight firmly within the narrative of these heinous miscarriages of the civil rights era. "Trayvon Martin will for ever remain in the annals of history next to Medgar Evers and Emmett Till as symbols for the fight for equal justice for all," Benjamin Crump said.

Yet even for those who agreed with the sentiment, the comparison bore one crucial flaw. Back then there was a movement that could take these tragedies, channel the frustration and bitterness into concrete political demands, and take them to the streets. Today the frustration and bitterness remain but the strategic and organisational means to act on them have dissipated. When news of Zimmerman's acquittal came in I was at a party of mostly black folk in Chicago. The mood there turned quickly from celebration to wake. Then the crying started.

It is 50 years since the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, at which Martin Luther King made his "I have a dream" speech, and that should force a reckoning with how much was achieved in those tumultuous times, and how much there is still to do. America has a black president and a sizeable moneyed black middle class, which, for the last two elections, has voted more or less at the same rate as its white counterpart. But the disparity between black and white unemployment is the same as it was 50 years ago and this summer voting rights protections, a key victory of the civil rights era, have been gutted by the Supreme Court. There has also been a New York court ruling against the city's stop-and-frisk policy, which terrorised low-income black and Latino neighbourhoods.

For all that, America's capacity for nostalgia, which borders on patriotic delusion in matters of civil rights and racial justice, should not be underestimated. When King died, he had become an increasingly margin-alised figure. Twice as many Americans had an unfavourable view of him as a favourable one just two years before his assassination in 1968. Yet by 1999 a poll of the most admired public figures of the 20th century found only Mother Teresa to be more popular. And in 2011, when a memorial to King was unveiled near the National Mall in Washington, DC (where demonstrators gathered to hear him in 1963), featuring a 30-foot-high statue sited on four acres of prime cultural real estate, 91 per cent of Americans--including 89 per cent of white people--approved.

There has been the same shift in perceptions of the civil rights movement as a whole. A month before the March on Washington, 54 per cent of white Americans thought the Kennedy administration "was pushing racial integration too fast". A few months after, 59 per cent of northern whites and 78 per cent of southern whites disapproved of "actions Negroes have taken to obtain civil rights". …

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