Why Vaccines Are an Investment in the Future

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), September 18, 2013 | Go to article overview

Why Vaccines Are an Investment in the Future


GOVERNMENTS who prioritise the purchase of medicines and vaccines as a worthwhile and cost-effective public intervention are investing in the future of their country.

Last year, the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA) reported that a child born in 1955 had an average life expectancy at birth of only 48 years, but by 2000 she or he could expect to live 66 years and globally, life expectancy is predicted to rise to 73 years by 2025.

Whereas the global child mortality rate stood at 77 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2000, by 2009 this figure had already decreased to 62.

In the first decade of the 21st century alone, an estimated 2.5 million deaths were prevented each year among children under the age of five through the use of measles, polio and diphtheria-tetanus pertussis vaccines.

Vaccines are particularly important because they protect the public from preventable disease, helping to save lives and prevent ill health, while minimising costs to the National Health Service.

Diseases, like polio and smallpox, have been eradicated and others, like measles and malaria, have become significantly less prevalent.

Earlier this year Wales saw a serious outbreak of measles in the Swansea community due to reduced "herd immunity", which was addressed by emergency vaccination clinics organised by several health boards.

Herd immunity describes the process which occurs when the vaccination of a significant portion of a population provides protection for those individuals who have not developed immunity or received vaccination. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Why Vaccines Are an Investment in the Future
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.