Lloyd-Webber Is Tuning Up for Fugue Success

Daily Mail (London), September 23, 2013 | Go to article overview

Lloyd-Webber Is Tuning Up for Fugue Success


Byline: MARCUS TOWNEND

SHOULD Lord Lloyd-Webber need distractions from the pressures of launching his latest musical, they could come galloping towards him in the next few weeks.

By the time Stephen Ward -- based on the 1963 Profumo scandal -- opens in December, the composer's racehorses may have made a dramatic impact of their own.

Top of the bill is the composer's John Gosden-trained The Fugue. The three-time group-one winner may sidestep next month's Arc because of soft ground in Paris but definitely heads to November's Breeders' Cup in California.

Fresh talent from Watership Down, the stud created in Lloyd-Webber's Berkshire back garden, will also grace the stage for a first time -- notably The Fugue's Shamardal yearling halfbrother and an Oasis Dream colt, which is the first offspring of his outstanding mare Dar Re Mi. Both sell at Tattersalls in Newmarket next month.

With improving economic signals and the growing influence of Qatari buyers competing alongside established European bloodstock giants, bidding could conceivably start to threaten the 1999 European record of 3.4million guineas paid for Watership Down yearling Diaghilev.

Day-to-day running of the stud falls to Lady Lloyd-Webber, general manager Simon Marsh and stud manager Terry Doherty. But Lady Lloyd-Webber, a former three-day eventer, says her husband takes a keen interest.

She added: 'He doesn't read the Racing Post every day but it is amazing what he picks up and we keep him fully informed -- not with the irritating small things but the big decisions. He knew we were selling [The Fugue's dam] Twyla Tharp last year and reinvesting.

He named The Fugue himself because Twyla Tharp, an American choreographer, designed a dance called the fugue. …

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