The Shift in Food Preferences

Manila Bulletin, September 29, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Shift in Food Preferences


Whether we like it or not; whether we admit or not, the consumer preferences in food are shifting fast in favor of organic or natural choices.

One may ask: Why is this so? Why are organic or natural foods gaining popularity compared with other food preparations like genetically modified (GM) foods. Simply because, there is now a growing perception worldwide that organic or natural foods are healthier than other food preparations particularly genetically-modified food preparations - because organic or natural foods are not grown; raised; or processed with the use of synthetic chemicals or pesticides. People with allergies to food chemicals or preservatives also find their symptoms lesser or completely gone when they eat organic or natural food preparations. No wonder, more and more people are patronizing organic or natural food preparation everyday worldwide - despite the fact that these food preparations are more expensive than the genetically modified foods.

The definition of genetically modified foods as found in the Internet is as follows: "foods that have been altered in a biological and botanical way, usually by modifying them in the laboratory, while they are still in their seed or plant stages, by adding nutrients or increasing its resistance to certain pests." The plants or animals whose DNA have been altered are known as genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

One may wish to know if organic products contain GMOs. Organic foods are not supposed to contain GMOs. For example, organic livestock are supposed to be given organic feed and not antibiotics, growth hormones or fed animal by-products. Accumulated build-up of pesticide (chemicals like fungicides, herbicides and insecticides) exposure in our bodies (residues of these chemicals remain in the food we eat) may lead to health problems like headaches, birth defects (pesticides can be passed from mother to child in the womb), diseases of the nervous systems and various kinds of cancer - due to the build-up of strain or the weakened immune system.

The competition between organic or natural foods and genetically modified food preparations (containing GMOs) is getting stiffer nowadays. While there is a growing demand for organic food products despite its expensive price - in the case of genetically modified food preparations, more areas of land in US and in other countries are also being devoted to the planting of genetically modified (GM) crops like corn, soybeans and other agricultural products. …

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