"I Really like Miliband, So I Don't Want to Diss Him": While Nick Clegg Remains Comfortable in Coalition with the Tories, the Lib Dem President, Tim Farron, Has Other Ambitions

By Eaton, George | New Statesman (1996), September 13, 2013 | Go to article overview

"I Really like Miliband, So I Don't Want to Diss Him": While Nick Clegg Remains Comfortable in Coalition with the Tories, the Lib Dem President, Tim Farron, Has Other Ambitions


Eaton, George, New Statesman (1996)


Enter Tim Farron's Westminster office and the first thing you notice is a giant wall planner on which the words "presidential visit" repeatedly appear. They are, I realise, a reference not to Barack Obama but to Farron's upcoming election battleground speeches. You might suppress a laugh at the thought of hard-pressed Liberal Democrat candidates greeting the decidedly unflashy Farron as "Mr President", yet it is a reminder of his unique status in British politics. As the party's directly elected president, Farron has a personal mandate from party members and at the same time, as a non-minister, he remains unbound by collective responsibility. To the undoubted relief of David Cameron and Ed Miliband, there is no equivalent in either Labour or the Conservatives.

Since the formation of the coalition government, Farron has defied the party whip on tuition fees, the NHS bill and secret courts. The MP for Westmorland and Lonsdale did so again on Syria, the subject to which we turn once his long-serving aide Paul Butters has brought him a cup of tea. Why did he abstain from the vote in parliament on 29 August, rather than oppose the motion outright?

"What I expected when I talked to Nick [Clegg] on the Tuesday and what I expected us to be asked to vote on would be something that would be a rush to military action," Farron says. "I spent the best part of48 hours pleading with Nick that we ought to go through the UN, that there should be no immediate rush to military intervention, not least because we need to have as much evidence as is humanly possible...

"The thing is, when you see the motion that ended up before the House, I'd got all the things I'd asked for and there was no rush to military action; there was the UK-led attempt to go through the UN. And I felt that, having got what I wanted, it would be a bit churlish to vote against."

He adds, however, that had there been a second vote, he would have opposed military action. "I made it very clear that if it was a call to intervene militarily, I would have voted against. If the vote had been won and we'd been back here voting on action this week, I'd have been in the No lobby."

We are meeting shortly before the start of what is the most important Liberal Democrat conference since the party entered government. In Glasgow, MPs and activists will vote on which policies to include in the party's 2015 manifesto. Clegg aims to use the occasion to complete the Lib Dems' transformation into a grown-up "party of government" by inviting members to endorse the policies pursued by the coalition: an aggressive austerity programme, a reduced top rate of income tax and tuition fees of [pounds sterling]9,000. Like a student who returns home from university and tears down his Che Guevara posters before embarking on a respectable career in the City, Clegg wants the party to put away childish things. He is determined that the Lib Dems will enter the next election unencumbered by unwisely made pledges such as the one on tuition fees.

The fear among activists is that the result will be a bland, centrist document seemingly crafted with a second Conservative-Lib Dem coalition in mind. It is a concern shared by Farron. "The most important thing from our perspective--and I'm a member of the manifesto group--is that we ensure that our manifesto is 100 per cent Liberal Democrat. You don't pre-concede on things. So if we think the Tories wouldn't accept putting the top rate of tax back up to sop but we want to, then we stick it in there and we negotiate from that point." Though Farron avoids mentioning Clegg by name, he tells me: "There's a danger that some people in the party might think we should concede and maybe write bits of our manifesto on the basis of what we think other parties would accept, rather than on the basis of what we want to achieve."

The question of what the Lib Dems want to achieve is equally divisive. Asked recently about the possibility of pledging to restore the sop rate of tax, David Laws, the schools minister and a close ally of Clegg, warned against policies that raise little revenue and are "just symbols". …

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