Human Displacement an Enduring Theme in Our Literature

Cape Times (South Africa), October 8, 2013 | Go to article overview

Human Displacement an Enduring Theme in Our Literature


BYLINE: Russell H Kaschula

Human settlement, more often than not, emanates from human displacement.

This displacement has for centuries been driven by political and religious upheavals; changes in weather patterns, colonisation and epidemics. These resulted and continue to result in wars, floods, fires, droughts, famine and death.

In many instances, one form of displacement leads to another. For example, war can lead to famine and the outbreak of epidemics, especially when people are held in confined spaces such as concentration camps and prisons.

In South Africa, there has hardly been a period of longer than 10 years without the major outbreak of a disease, leading to death and displacement. This began with the epidemic of smallpox which just about wiped out the local population when the Europeans arrived, through to Spanish influenza (which killed 300 000 South Africans in six weeks), polio and HIV-Aids These "big deaths" displaced entire families, sending survivors to seek sanctuary in different spaces and within various newly formed family configurations, including child-headed households.

Today one need only consider Syria and the Middle East, where people are being continually displaced by civil war. Floods have recently displaced hundreds of thousands of people in India, China, Mexico and New Zealand, while devastating fires in the US remain a constant threat. One can barely switch on the news without hearing the term "displaced" in relation to tsunamis, earthquakes and wars.

In the same way that the scramble for Africa displaced both Europeans and Africans, today Africans are on the move: From Somalia to Kenya, from the DRC to Rwanda, from Zimbabwe to South Africa and from Africa to the rest of the world. It is estimated that there are over 400 000 South Africans living in the UK alone and more than two million Zimbabweans living in South Africa. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Human Displacement an Enduring Theme in Our Literature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.