Print Offers a Personal Touch; Research Shows That Consumers Trust Print Advertising

Cape Times (South Africa), October 5, 2013 | Go to article overview

Print Offers a Personal Touch; Research Shows That Consumers Trust Print Advertising


BYLINE: Amelia Richards

Why do brand owners continue to opt for print advertising? Newspaper advertisements are preferred to any other advertising, according to 43 percent of South African consumers (TGi 2012C). The effectiveness of print advertising has been a hot topic of debate among brand and media owners.

Despite the myth that consumers do not notice advertising any more, research results show the contrary.

Ask Afrika's TGi (Target Group Index) research was based on 15 000 interviews with consumers across the country and illustrates why brand owners continue to opt for print advertising.

Community newspapers are the key: when consumers go bargain hunting, 48 percent say they search for bargains in their local newspapers. The same research trends were echoed in the annual Compass24 survey (commissioned by Ads24) that focused on Media24 local newspaper titles.

The 13 958 interviews represented the views of 5 530 457 South African consumers, of whom 68 percent preferred to read advertising in their newspaper as opposed to receiving it in their post box.

South Africans read and respond to advertising and brand owners should be aware that we are living in a world where personalisation is becoming increasingly important. When designing advertising campaigns, it's important to remember that local newspapers are the perfect platform to connect with consumers on this level.

Local papers are less generic and more approachable, and are therefore trusted. We perceive them differently. Advertising in local newspapers should elicit a very specific call to action. In this way, brand owners can capitalise on South Africans' innate enthusiasm for advertising.

They provide the opportunity to publish those social investment stories that consumers want to hear but brands sometimes struggle with. …

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