INSIDE the BRAIN on the BOX

Cape Times (South Africa), October 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

INSIDE the BRAIN on the BOX


National Geographic Channels International explores the amazing powers of the human mind in Brain Games, a series presented by JASON SILVA on Wednesdays at 8.55pm on DStv channel 181. The first series runs for 12 episodes of 30 minutes each.

What we can expect?

A really amazing, exhilarating ride that awakens a sense of wonder about how your brain works. Brain Games highlights how you perceive reality through a series of interactive games and experiments and optical illusions that create a crack, really, in how you perceive reality.

Through realising the shortcomings in how you perceive reality, we create a hook that makes people want to understand what is happening, and then we teach them what is happening through explainers and neuroscience featuring experts and myself. People are going to have a good time.

How did you get involved in the show?

I was reading a series of short documentaries exploring how we use technology to expand the boundaries of the brain. I'm interested not just in science, but also in the relationship between science, technology and human evolution. Kind of a philosophical obsession of mine.

National Geographic caught wind of the videos. They loved the energy and enthusiasm behind my performances. I was contacted and asked if I wanted to be a presenter. It's great to be part of something that is all about content that informs and inspires.

Each episode tackles a different subject related to the brain. How does it work?

We tackle subjects such as lying, and visual perception, and persuasion and fear, and the difference between male and female brains. So every episode picks a theme and then we start off with a visual game usually, that is adapted from real... research on the brain. We ask people at home to participate, so the star of the show in the end is the viewer. Playing the game affects you. It gets you. You experience the exhilaration of realising how little you really know about what you perceive at any given moment.

Then we do a man on the street section where we do the experiments on other people. You can watch, play along, and usually I come on screen and explain what's going on. Then we have an expert maybe chime in as well. Sometimes we have a deception specialist, Apollo Robbins, demonstrate visually how he can misdirect your attention or whatever topic we are exploring.

Usually that will start all over again for the next topic and then I'll do another visual game, and then explain it and so on and so forth. A mixture of participatory elements, man on the street, and hosted explainers. It really seems to be a great formula, actually, because people find the show addictive.

Name your favourite brain games?

I really liked a lot of the word puzzles. We have people read a sign that says "Think you can't be fooled" and you write the sentence "Think you you can't be fooled" and nobody gets it right when they read it 10 times.

It's because the brain is so quick to extract meaningful information from the world and look for patterns that it fails to pay attention to small details. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

INSIDE the BRAIN on the BOX
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.