Hultzen Saga Shows There's No Such Thing as Can't-Miss Pitching Prospect

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 9, 2013 | Go to article overview

Hultzen Saga Shows There's No Such Thing as Can't-Miss Pitching Prospect


Byline: Nathan Fenno, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The lonely truth of making a living on pitching mounds is easy to forget as October's chill descends.

Throwing a baseball is inherently unnatural, but catch a glimpse of someone like Michael Wacha, the 22-year-old revelation for the Cardinals, and the reality disappears in an explosion of flashbulbs.

The rookie right-hander pitched St. Louis past the Pirates on Monday with 7 1/3 innings of one-hit baseball and forced a decisive Game 5 in the National League Division Series.

In a game that chews up young pitchers, the former first-round draft pick has survived. So far. But for every Wacha making the craft look easy in front of a stadium that lives on each pitch, there is a Danny Hultzen.

The Bethesda native is the other side. He attended St. Albans School, then the University of Virginia before the Mariners drafted him No. 2 overall in 2011. He's the fragile part of Major League Baseball we don't talk about much come October.

Another injured pitcher.

Invent a prospect and he'd look a lot like Hultzen. Unflappable demeanor on the mound. Studious and well-spoken off the field. The sort of person

you want as the face of an organization. A left arm that flung fastballs up to 94 miles per hour. Polish. Discipline not to try and blow away hitters. Command of his pitches that drew comparisons to Cliff Lee.

Buzzwords stalked Hultzen: High floor. Safe.

The Mariners guaranteed him $6.35 million to sign. A quick trip through the minor leagues and into the majors seemed inevitable.

Baseball America and MLB.com ranked Hultzen as one of the game's top 30 prospects before the season. But the 23-year-old is a pitcher, baseball's equivalent of spinning a roulette wheel.

Last week, Dr. James Andrews repaired Hultzen's left shoulder in Pensacola, Fla. The familiar story unraveled between aborted comebacks over the past six months: he couldn't get loose, two months off, the diagnosis of a strained rotator cuff and tendinitis, struggling to get loose again, last month's ominous news of a visit to Dr. Andrews. Then surgery.

The man who fixed Robert Griffin III's right knee repaired Hultzen's labrum. And his rotator cuff. And his shoulder capsule.

That's the holy trinity of terror for pitchers. An injury to one of those areas is enough to throw a career off track, never mind forcing a pitcher off the mound for a year or more. Three is devastating.

In 2007, surgery repaired all three areas for can't-miss Cubs pitcher Mark Prior. He hasn't appeared in a major league game since, exiled to the minors by a series of follow-up surgeries and abortive comebacks. …

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