Do You Find Work Less Than Fulfilling? UK Workers Are Less Fulfilled Than Their International Peers, According to a Poll, but with Low Job Satisfaction Leading to Increased Staff Turnover, Businesses Need to Act. So What Is the Solution? by Niki Chesworth

The Evening Standard (London, England), October 10, 2013 | Go to article overview

Do You Find Work Less Than Fulfilling? UK Workers Are Less Fulfilled Than Their International Peers, According to a Poll, but with Low Job Satisfaction Leading to Increased Staff Turnover, Businesses Need to Act. So What Is the Solution? by Niki Chesworth


Byline: Niki Chesworth

BRITAIN's workers have been identified as being among the least professionally fulfilled in Europe and the English-speaking world.

These poor levels of job satisfaction are resulting in more absenteeism which now costs business an average of [pounds sterling]975 per year per employee, or a total of [pounds sterling]14 billion as well as having an impact on levels of engagement and intention to quit.

This in turn leads to high staff turnover, which also then makes it even more likely that employees will feel dissatisfied with their job.

Recruiter Randstad, which commissioned the survey of approximately 45,000 workers, warns that this problem is likely to intensify, particularly as employers can no longer rely on the economic downturn to keep talented staff. So what is the solution? VARIETY WORKS If your employer hired more women and a mix of younger and older employees, who tend to find work more fulfilling, then that could boost overall job satisfaction and therefore profits, says Randstad in its Fulfilment@Work report, which was launched with philosopher Alain de Botton, author of The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work.

Research shows that it is those in the middle of their professional lives, between the ages of 35 and 55, who tend to feel less fulfilled.

Mark Bull, CEO of Randstad UK, which unveiled the findings yesterday at its How I Became campaign, says: "Our research shows a mid-career crisis is a very real phenomenon. Those who are midway through their career often reflect on the professional path they have taken and where that path is leaving them. And this leaves many with a feeling of anxiety that they are not fulfilled in what they do and nor are they fulfilling their potential.

"What is clear is that employers who are keen to increase the overall professional fulfilment of their workforce can ensure they are hiring older workers as well as passionate young people."

The same applies to women, who are more likely to be professionally fulfilled. …

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Do You Find Work Less Than Fulfilling? UK Workers Are Less Fulfilled Than Their International Peers, According to a Poll, but with Low Job Satisfaction Leading to Increased Staff Turnover, Businesses Need to Act. So What Is the Solution? by Niki Chesworth
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