Andy Harper: Archaeology in Reverse: Newlyn Art Gallery 6 July to 28 September

By Lee, Stephen | Art Monthly, October 2013 | Go to article overview

Andy Harper: Archaeology in Reverse: Newlyn Art Gallery 6 July to 28 September


Lee, Stephen, Art Monthly


Brain functioning seems to be immanent in Andy Harper's twinned abstract paintings. The technique of hinging a painting to its doppelganger or ghosted image is repeated throughout the show. The method is about reflecting inherent neurological patterns of thought applied to painting and this process gains critical weight through the emergence of metaphor.

The admirably uninhibited and strange Glass Alba, 2011, stands out as a mindful and beautiful diptych. The original image, a vague insect-shaped portrait that suggests zany and exaggerated colourful floral shapes was mono-printed on to a second canvas. When peeled apart the surfaces must have had the quality of painterly sludge resulting in a thin printed image on the duplicate. Both paintings were then worked with brushes into their current state in a visual conversation. The face and eye regions take on the appearance of deep spatial thickets. Expanding eye openings are contoured by frond-like, wet-into-wet gestural painted marks, buds and smears. Likewise, the predominantly white-on-white double has gestural marks experienced in symmetry. It is possible to say that intricate pathways in Harper's mind have been extensively triggered by the symmetry, medium, method and memory, yet my inkling is that the inception and reception of these images is more than the sum of their neurological parts.

Centrally located in the exhibition space and carrying the title of the exhibition, several recent large canvases are joined together to form a zigzag structure similar to a folding Japanese screen. From each side of the screen we see the front of some of the paintings next to the backs of others, so that highly worked surfaces over mono-printed fragments are seen alongside the reverse surface of canvas and wooden frame. Again there is an abundance of plant forms, in this case integrated with architectural pattern, while vestiges of the early modernist abstraction of Futurism and Vorticism make these visually dynamic works. Around the walls, smaller rapidly made paintings composed of thin linseed oil washes, gestures and printed marks continue the visual doubling but the pairs are reshuffl ed so that the juxtapositions do not directly match up with a mother print. The overall effect is a room full of reflective comparative studies where remembered symmetries are visually rewarded as the viewer finds pieces of a complex puzzle by walking, turning and looking back.

Not surprisingly, the artist is also interested in the conceptual space and methods of artificial intelligence. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Andy Harper: Archaeology in Reverse: Newlyn Art Gallery 6 July to 28 September
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.