Bar Mitzvahs and Burns Night

By Grant, Linda | New Statesman (1996), September 20, 2013 | Go to article overview

Bar Mitzvahs and Burns Night


Grant, Linda, New Statesman (1996)


No Place Like Home: Britain's Jewish Community in the 21st Century

Judah Passow

Bloomsbury Continuum, 22.4pp, [pounds sterling]25

The Israeli-born photojournalist Judah Passow, who over the past 35 years has covered the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and wars in Lebanon and Bosnia, has finally turned his attention to home: to the Jewish community of the British Isles where he has lived for most of his working life.

His book No Place Like Home, with an introduction by the Guardian journalist Jonathan Freedland, takes its inspiration from an observation about home by his father, an American rabbi and scholar. "More than anything else, though," he writes, "my father loved the fact that Judaism was at its core essentially an idea, and that everything that flowed from that big idea is just someone's interpretation."

Passow has worked, whenever the industry has allowed him, in black and white. These pictures, with their strong compositions, attest to an eye that captures the significant moments in Jewish life. The Jewish community in Britain has been shrinking as a result of intermarriage and emigration, and is now down to about 290,000. But as Passow demonstrates, it is both diverse and dynamic, with the greatest continued growth being among the ultra-Orthodox Jews who were uncommon in my childhood--now extending out from London to one of the world's great centres of Talmudic study, Gateshead.

A portrait of a group of elderly men and women sitting on the seafront at Southend, watching a beach with the tide out and the sky lowering under grey cloud thick with imminent drizzle, underlines the difference between British Jews and their American counterparts, retired in Miami. Determined to enjoy themselves whatever the weather, these are the Jews born in the old East End who moved out to colonise Hendon in the Fifties and Sixties. Until the postwar period, Jews were Britain's only significant ethnic minority, determined to keep their heads down and not attract unwanted attention.

Yet as you progress through the book in its organic, non-demarcated sections that include family celebrations, food, worship, issues, charity and fundraising, multiculturalism, birth, old age, death and burial, it is apparent that this is indeed 21st-century Britain. A young yeshiva student turns away from the open book to consult his two mobile phones. Two gay men in kippas dance in each other's arms. At a religious service a woman in a tallit reads from the Torah, her hand on the head of a boy with a dummy in his mouth. …

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