Reflections on the Society's History: A Memorial to John M. Virgo

By Pfouts, Ralph W. | Atlantic Economic Journal, September 2013 | Go to article overview

Reflections on the Society's History: A Memorial to John M. Virgo


Pfouts, Ralph W., Atlantic Economic Journal


The news of John Virgo's death saddened me greatly. He was a good friend, and the death of a friend is always depressing. But John represented more than friendship. He was a man who had done something that was very rare; it was in fact almost unique.

Many economists were interested in doing research and research was needed, but getting it published or verbally presented was difficult. Thus, a good deal of economic research was not made known. This also discouraged additional research.

Like most economists, John was aware of this situation. But unlike most economists, he decided to do something about it. He organized a group of economists who held meetings at which the results of economic research were made known, and they published a research journal. Indeed, they ultimately ended up publishing two research journals. The organization was known as the Atlantic Economic Society. It later became known as the International Atlantic Economic Society.

The word "International" was richly deserved because John expanded the activities of the Society to include European meetings. The European membership became large and active, served as officers of the Society, presented research findings at meetings, and published research in the journals.

Since I am a charter member of the Society, perhaps it would be appropriate for me to offer a few memories of the earliest days of the Atlantic Economic Society. The first indication of the Society that I had came through the mail. It was a mimeographed invitation to attend the first meeting of the Atlantic Economic Society, which would be held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.

Thus, the Society held its first meeting at the Richmond Fed. I am sure of this because I remember asking a very young member if he had seen the "discount window." The joke was on me because he actually wanted to see the discount window. Of course, there is no actual discount window; it is a verbal expression.

John ran the meetings very pleasantly and very effectively. The Society was officially organized. Officers were chosen. John was elected President, other officers and members of the Board of Directors were chosen. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Reflections on the Society's History: A Memorial to John M. Virgo
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.