Work-Life Balance for Men: Counseling Implications

By Evans, Amanda M.; Carney, Jamie S. et al. | Journal of Counseling and Development : JCD, October 2013 | Go to article overview

Work-Life Balance for Men: Counseling Implications


Evans, Amanda M., Carney, Jamie S., Wilkinson, Morgan, Journal of Counseling and Development : JCD


There is clear evidence that men underutilize counseling services for mental health issues (Schaub & Williams, 2007). The reasons for this are complicated and intertwined with personal, social, and cultural values and beliefs (Grant & Potenza, 2007; Meth, Pasick, Gordon, Allen, Feidman, & Gordon, 1990). It is believed that men's underutilization of counseling may be based, in part, on men's perception of the counseling process and the belief that expression of emotional or psychological distress is negative and does not fit socially sanctioned ideals of male behavior (Aldoory, Jiang, Toth, & Sha, 2008; Cochran & Rabinowtiz, 2000). These constraints, experienced by both men and women, can be rigid, difficult to manage, and may result in distress across all aspects of an individual's life (Cochran & Rabinowitz, 2000). The stress is intensified when one's personal needs and beliefs directly contradict or are challenged by these cultural and perceived social expectations and stereotypes (O'Neil, Good, & Holmes, 1995). One area where men may experience such stress is in the process of attempting to balance careers, families, personal lives, and relationships (Aumann, Galinsky, & Matos, 2011; Duckworth & Buzzanell, 2009; Perrone, Wright, & Jackson, 2009). Work-life balance can be a process of finding personal meaning and satisfaction across multiple roles and aspects of one's life. There is an imperative that counselors begin to view this process from the male perspective and identify counseling techniques to assist men in exploring, addressing, and working toward their own conceptualization of work-life balance.

Balancing work life with personal life appears to be an almost universal struggle. It is embodied in varying degrees and ways among both men and women. The process of attempting to balance the demands and expectations of one's career, personal life, interpersonal relationships, partnerships, and family has been explored extensively over the last decade (Emslie & Hunt, 2009; Perrone et al., 2009). However, the majority of research has focused on women (Burke, 2000). Research has clearly illustrated that, for many women, this process of balancing can be psychologically, physically, and personally debilitating (Aumann et al., 2011). Although research in the area of work-life balance has historically focused on women, there are clear indications that this is also a significant and critical issue for men. A study commissioned by the Families and Work Institute revealed that men may now experience more work-family conflict than women experience (Aumann et al., 2011). There is currently a paucity of research fully exploring work-life balance among men as well as appropriate counseling strategies and methods to address this issue. In this article, we explore the concept of work-life balance for men and describe a counseling framework for treating these issues.

Work-Life Balance

The first step in discussing work-life balance is the consideration of how work-life balance is defined. Several researchers have attempted to define work-life balance, primarily focusing on a process of attempting to balance the multidimensions of work or career with other personal dimensions that include family, partners, and other relationships or interests. This is similar to the concept of role overload, which emphasizes the problem of limited time and resources to manage multiple roles (Higgins, Duxbury, & Lyons, 2010). Reiter (2007) has suggested that most definitions of work-life balance are either situational or absolute. An example of an absolutist conceptualization of work-life balance is provided by Greenhaus, Collins, and Shaw (2003). In their model, work-life balance includes time balance, involvement balance, and satisfaction balance. Thus, work-life balance is successfully attained when individuals are equally engaged and satisfied across their work and life roles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Work-Life Balance for Men: Counseling Implications
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.