Prospect to Honor Guth's Training Legacy

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Prospect to Honor Guth's Training Legacy


Growing up in Waupun, a small Wisconsin town, Matt Guth did not have a lot of opportunities to play sports as a child.

"I was not very athletic, and the coaches in my school suggested that I attend an athletic training camp because they knew I was interested in athletics," he said.

Those coaches sure made the right suggestion.

Guth went on to become one of the top high school athletic trainers in Illinois.

A member of the Illinois Athletic Trainer Association Hall of Fame, Guth is retiring after 34 years as the head athletic trainer at Prospect High School.

He will be recognized at this Friday's football game when Prospect hosts Elk Grove.

Guth's resume includes working in the United States Olympic Committee sports medicine program, briefly with the 1980 Olympic Hockey team, and traveling to Bulgaria for the 1983 Winter World University Games as part of the U.S. medical staff.

Guth worked on professional regulation in getting the Illinois Athletic Training Practice Act passed in 1986.

A number of his student aides have also pursued careers in athletic training or other health care professions.

Guth was on the sidelines for Prospect's three state championships in football (2001, 2002, and 2005). He was also with the school's boys basketball team when it played at the United Center in 2009 and earlier this year. He has been at countless events at Prospect.

Suffice it to say, he is one of the most recognizable faces in Prospect athletics.

Of the 331 varsity football games Prospect has played since Guth's first year in 1980, he has missed no more than 10.

"I have been blessed with a supportive family (wife Diane, and children Justin and Hannah) that has accepted the demands of my profession," Guth said. "My wife and children have always understood my professional dedication and supported my work life. I hope to give them more time and attention in the next phase of my life.

His life at Prospect started after he finished college at Wisconsin-LaCrosse and grad school at Illinois State.

Guth began pursuing an athletic training career on the collegiate level.

"But there were very few jobs available in 1980," he said. "A friend from the area told me about some positions open in District 214, so I put in an application."

After the interview process, Guth was offered the job at Prospect and the rest is history.

Over the years, he has seen many sports added with more levels and year-round activity for varsity sports.

He has seen the introduction of concussion management and ImPACT testing along with more attention to infection control.

"There has also been a greater outside influence on athlete's performances from personal coaches and fitness trainers," Guth said. "And there has been an increased awareness of athletic training, creating a greater need of athletic training positions to care for the athletically active population."

Guth has enjoyed many aspects of his job.

"We have always had great kids and supportive families," he said. "We've had an excellent coaching and teaching faculty at Prospect which always has the best interest of the student in mind while guiding them and trying to put competitive teams on the field."

Guth said the building administrators have always supported the work that the athletic training staff has done.

"They've provided us with what was needed to take care of our kids," he said. "Throughout the years, when we've had exceptional teams, it's always created an energy and buzz in the community. That energy keeps the job fresh and exciting, and makes the time fly by."

Guth will miss the interaction with the students and staff, and the energy from the students.

"Each year, you have new faces and new challenges," he said. "And while athletic trainers function in more of a health care role, we also do a lot of teaching as we interact with the students. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Prospect to Honor Guth's Training Legacy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.