Scaffolding Environment for E-Learning through Cloud Computing

By Despotovic-Zrakic, Marijana; Simic, Konstantin et al. | Educational Technology & Society, July 2013 | Go to article overview

Scaffolding Environment for E-Learning through Cloud Computing


Despotovic-Zrakic, Marijana, Simic, Konstantin, Labus, Aleksandra, Milic, Aleksandar, Jovanic, Branislav, Educational Technology & Society


Introduction

In recent years e-learning has grown into a widely accepted way of learning, and the usage of the global network is inevitable in every education process. Ubiquitous learning integrates wireless, mobile and context awareness technologies in order to detect the situation of the learners and provide more seamless adaptive support beyond formal learning process (Shih, Chu, Hwang, & Kinshuk, 2011; Hwang, Chih-Hsiang, Tseng, & Huang, 2011, ElBakry & Mastorakis, 2009; Yang, 2006). In order to support modern pedagogical approaches, as well as a variety of heterogenic learning resources within courses, ubiquitous learning environments need to be based on a powerful IT infrastructure. At the same time, in order to be efficient, ubiquitous learning environments need to be based on learning management systems (hereinafter: LMS) and integrated into an existing e-learning environment of educational institutions.

LMSs are powerful integrated systems that support a number of activities performed by teachers and students during the e-learning process (Hauger & Kock, 2007; Kahiigi, Ekenberg, Hansson, Tusubira, & Danielson, 2007). In most cases, LMS users belong to heterogeneous groups with different, sometimes even adverse, individual characteristics and needs. The adaptation of e-education systems to an individual or to a group based on their characteristics, expectations, knowledge, and preferences is nowadays inevitable (Paramythis & Loidl-Reisinger, 2004). Since systems for adaptive e-learning are becoming more complex, educational institutions need new solutions for deploying scalable and reliable environments for adaptive e-learning (Aroyo, Dolog, Houben, Kravcik, Naeve, Nilsson, & Wild, 2006).

In this paper we set out to explore how an environment for adaptive e-learning can be provided through cloud computing. The main goal of the research is to provide a highly effective, scalable cloud computing services for endusers. The research context of this paper is focused on the e-learning processes within the E-Business Lab, the University of Belgrade.

Related work

Cloud computing (hereinafter: CC) is an abstract, scalable and controlled computer infrastructure that hosts applications for the end-users. CC is an area of computing that refers to providing customers with highly scalable IT capacities as a service via the Internet (Sultan, 2010). Services and data coexist in a shared and dynamically scaled set of resources (Srinivasa, Nageswara, & Kumari, 2009). Virtualization is one of prerequisites for the realization of CC (Dong, Zheng, Yang, Li, & Qiao, 2009). It allows for an efficient usage of resources, because several virtual machines (hereinafter: VM) can operate on one physical machine (Jin, Liao, Wu, Shao, & Luo, 2008). CC is an infrastructure that can bring a new value to an e-learning system, as educational services can be delivered in a reliable and efficient way. It also provides a suitable environment for ubiquitous learning activities. As a result, efforts to introduce CC in e-learning environment have been initiated over the last couple of years and are ongoing across the world. However, shifting from a traditional IT infrastructure to a cloud based infrastructure is a complex task for an educational institution (Reich, Hubner, & Kuijs, 2012).

The background for this research can be found in the works that explain the benefits of using CC infrastructure in e- learning (Dong, Zheng, Yang, Li, & Qiao, 2009; Zhang, 2010). In (Pocatilu, Alecu, & Vetrici, 2009) the authors explain the key benefits of the CC application in e-learning: improved improbability, virtualization, centralized data storage, costs. Doelitzscher et al. (2011) notice that universities' information systems have periods of intensive usage, when available hardware and software resources have to be efficiently used. Dong et al. (2009b) give a good theoretical and practical basis about using CC infrastructure in e-learning. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Scaffolding Environment for E-Learning through Cloud Computing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.