Prospective Foreign Language Teachers' Preference of Teaching Methods for the Language Acquisition Course in Turkish Higher Education

By Guvendir, Emre | Education, Fall 2013 | Go to article overview

Prospective Foreign Language Teachers' Preference of Teaching Methods for the Language Acquisition Course in Turkish Higher Education


Guvendir, Emre, Education


Introduction

Researchers argue that competence in a language or being a native speaker of it is not sufficient for teaching it, and foreign language teachers should have an awareness of language as a system (Wright and Bolitho, 1993; Brown 2007; Andrews, 1999, 2007; Thornbury, 1997; Luk and Wong, 2010; Giessler, 2012; Achugar, Schleppegrel, and Oteiza, 2007; Glasgow, 2008). According to Brown (2007), in order to teach a language effectively, foreign language teachers need to know the relationship between language and cognition, writing systems, nonverbal communication, sociolinguistics, and first language acquisition. How foreign language teachers understand the components of language will influence their teaching practices. Besides, "a linguistically-aware teacher will be in a strong and secure position to accomplish various tasks--preparing lessons; evaluating, adapting, and writing materials; understanding, interpreting, and ultimately designing a syllabus or curriculum; testing and assessing learners' performance; and contributing to English language work across the curriculum" (Wright and Bolitho, 1993, p. 292). If teachers are aware of the underlying systems of a language, they will teach it efficiently (Thornbury, 1997). Likewise, a foreign language teacher needs to reflect upon her knowledge of the underlying systems of the language, in order to maximize useful input for learning (Andrews, 1999).

Considering the importance of creating an awareness of the system of language for language teachers, it is common to see yearlong university courses that explore language as a system in foreign language departments of universities where prospective foreign language teachers are trained. Brown (2007, p. 06-07) lists possible fields and subfields covered in these courses as follows:

1. Explicit and formal accounts of the system of language on several possible levels (e.g., phonological, syntactic, lexical, and semantic analysis)

2. The symbolic nature of language; the relationship between language and reality; the philosophy of language; the history of language

3. Phonetics; phonology; writing systems; the role of gesture, distance, eye contact, and other "paralinguistic" features of language

4. Semantics; language and cognition; psycholinguistics

5. Communication systems; speaker-hearer interaction; sequence processing

6. Dialectology; sociolinguistics; language and culture; pragmatics; bilingualism and second language acquisition

7. Human language and nonhuman communication; neurolinguistics; innate factors; genetic transmission; nature vs. nurture

8. Language universals; first language acquisition

When these fields and subfields of linguistic research are considered, it is evident that it includes so many theoretical, sophisticated, and abstract concepts and topics that need to be taught by teacher educators to prospective foreign language teachers. In light of immense information to be conveyed in higher education courses covering these subjects, the teaching methods that will be used by the teacher in the classroom constitute a crucial theme.

Demirel (2006) presented 'the lecture method', 'the discussion method', 'the case method', 'the demonstration-performance method', 'the problem solving method', and 'the independent study method' as the common teaching methods used in education faculties. The lecture method is a traditional teaching method that has been used throughout the years as a means of transmitting information from a teacher to a group of students (Werner& DeSimone, 2009). It is also a one-way process of education and students are passive listeners while teachers are active agents of instruction (Henderson & Nash, 2007). The discussion method gives students the chance to be active participants and there is no expectation of information transfer only from teacher to the learner. While having classroom discussions students can explain their point of views and ideas rather than memorizing facts and details. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Prospective Foreign Language Teachers' Preference of Teaching Methods for the Language Acquisition Course in Turkish Higher Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.