Counting the Guns: After Half a Century of Civil War, South Sudan Is Awash with Small Arms Firearms but No One Knows Just How Many Guns Are out There or Who Has Them. to Get a Handle on the Situation, the Government Has Asked a South African Company to Conduct a 'Census' of Firearms by Marking Them

By Nevin, Tom | African Business, October 2013 | Go to article overview

Counting the Guns: After Half a Century of Civil War, South Sudan Is Awash with Small Arms Firearms but No One Knows Just How Many Guns Are out There or Who Has Them. to Get a Handle on the Situation, the Government Has Asked a South African Company to Conduct a 'Census' of Firearms by Marking Them


Nevin, Tom, African Business


At the height of Sudan's civil war, truck loads and camel caravans of small arms, mainly AK47S, were distributed around the then rebellious South Sudanese territory. They were handed out indiscriminately with no attempt at keeping such records as weapon registration, identification, ownership or locality. In the fight for independence there was no time or place for bureaucratic niceties.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Now that peace has broken out, and South Sudan is the world's youngest new nation, the fledgling government faces the awesome task of building an administration with an infrastructure, economy, social services and laws.

One such task is tracing all the firearms because all the government wants to know right now is how many there are out there, where they are and who owns them. The licensing of these small arms and light weapons (SALWs) will come much later when the administration and its ministries and departments are in place. The UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) has enlisted the services of a South African security partnership to establish a weapons marking and identification system in South Sudan. Once the programme is successfully up and running, it will be replicated in other African countries where the world body has operations and where weapons need to be identified for licensing as personal property, warehousing, destruction or deployment.

The marking and identification process is unique in Africa. It was designed and developed in South Africa by a partnership of FACTT, a company specialising in industrial authentication and tracking, and Traceability Solutions, a hardware development and manufacturing organisation.

"If ever there was a baptism by fire for our product, this is it," comments FACTT CEO Daan Davis. "The South Sudan area is awash with weapons after the decades-long war with Sudan, nearly all of them AK47S and each considered illegal because none is licensed "and that's because there is no way yet in the formative government of licensing them." Davis has no idea of the number of weapons to be counted and marked. "It's probably in the thousands," he says, "but that's just a guess because no one kept records."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Making a fresh start

South Sudan is a landlocked country of about 10m people just beginning the intricate task of nation building. Half a century of civil war between the North and the South means South Sudan is starting from scratch. The country, about half the size of South Africa, inherited a shambolic transport system of less than 100km of tarred roads, a Wild West mentality and halfhearted infrastructure and services. That's changing, and the SALW registration is one of the projects that's helping the country take its place in stability, recovery and lawfulness. South Sudan is also setting out to make friends with its neighbours, the wider regional community and the world at large. It must demonstrate that it is serious about being a good citizen in the global village and part of that job is making the country safer and security conscious. An important start is with its SALW census.

"Our system of unique 2D data matrix barcode encoded with a unique FP marked on weapons is not totally impervious to removal, but it is the most permanent way of marking the weapon ownership accountability chain," says Jordaan. "FACTT has issued over a million registration and identification markings, known by the trademarked name of Industrial Fingerprint (FP), for SALW application in South Sudan and the SADC."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"The identification process we have been tasked with is a census, if you like," says Kyle Parker, whose Traceability Solutions company specialises in the hardware aspects of all manner of identification and codification.

Traceability has a process unique in South Africa of marking weapons in such a way that the printing does not break the arms' protective "blue" rust-resistant coating and yet is scored deeply into the metal. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Counting the Guns: After Half a Century of Civil War, South Sudan Is Awash with Small Arms Firearms but No One Knows Just How Many Guns Are out There or Who Has Them. to Get a Handle on the Situation, the Government Has Asked a South African Company to Conduct a 'Census' of Firearms by Marking Them
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.