Poorer Army Leavers Most at Risk of Stress, Study Says; PLAID MP WANTS MENTAL HEALTH CHECKS ON ALL LEAVING THE FORCES

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), October 28, 2013 | Go to article overview

Poorer Army Leavers Most at Risk of Stress, Study Says; PLAID MP WANTS MENTAL HEALTH CHECKS ON ALL LEAVING THE FORCES


Byline: DAVID WILLIAMSON Political Editor david.williamson@walesonline.co.uk

PLAID Cymru parliamentary leader Elfyn Llwyd has called for everyone leaving the Armed Forces to be vetted for mental health problems, following the disturbing findings of a major report published today.

The Dwyfor Meirionnydd MP wants mental health issues identified as soon as possible so "catastrophic consequences" can be avoided.

Today's report from Forces Watch claims that young soldiers from disadvantaged backgrounds are more likely to suffer from mental health problems.

It found that younger recruits were significantly more likely than older personnel to suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); to drink at levels harmful to health; and to behave violently on their return from war.

The report calls for the minimum age of recruitment to be raised to 18, to avoid exposing the youngest soldiers to the most trauma.

The Fellowship of Reconciliation has previously petitioned the National Assembly to urge the Welsh Government to "recommend that the Armed Forces should not go into schools to recruit".

The Forces Watch report claims 8% of Iraq war veterans who enlisted without GCSEs suffered with PTSD after their deployment, compared with 4% in the Armed Forces as a whole and 3% in the general population.

According to the report, 26% of personnel aged 18-24 were found to be drinking at harmful levels - which, it said, was twice the 13% average for the Armed Forces and more than three times the 8% rate found among civilians of similar age.

It also found that 24% of Iraq war veterans in the lowest ranks - typically the youngest - reported behaving violently in the weeks after coming home. This compared to an average of 13% across the Armed Forces.

It says that recruits who enlist at 16 or 17, who are deployable to war as soon as they turn 18, are channelled disproportionately into the infantry, and that in the last five years the infantry received nearly a third (32%) of all new recruits under 18, despite accounting for just 14% of the Armed Forces.

The report claims that over the past 20 years, the suicide rate has been 82% higher among male soldiers under 20 than in civilian men of the same age, and that between 1996 and 2005 the suicide rate among former Armed Forces personnel under 20 was nearly three times as high as the same age group in the general population.

Mr Llwyd said: "The findings of this report are very disturbing but not surprising. The incidence of post-war mental health problems is many times greater than the MoD is prepared to admit and it is now high time that we highlighted the true nature and extent of the panoply of mental health issues affecting troops returning from warfare. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Poorer Army Leavers Most at Risk of Stress, Study Says; PLAID MP WANTS MENTAL HEALTH CHECKS ON ALL LEAVING THE FORCES
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.