The Heavy Price of Regulations; Rules Don't Make Sense When Their Costs Outweigh Their Benefits

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 29, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Heavy Price of Regulations; Rules Don't Make Sense When Their Costs Outweigh Their Benefits


Byline: Paul Driessen, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed onerous new limits carbon-dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants. The standards would prevent construction of new facilities, gradually close older ones and, eventually, affect even gas-fired units.

The EPA says the rules will safeguard our health from storms, sea-level rise and other ravages of man-made climate change. They are in addition to 1,900 other Obama-era regulations designed to curtail or terminate coal mining and use - and dictate activities affecting air and emissions, land and soils, waterways and puddles.

Far too often, the rules are based on speculative health and environmental claims, cherry-picked studies, dismissal of analyses that contradict agency assertions, and computer models that reflect unfounded assumptions and agenda-driven rule-making.

Many scientists challenge the EPA's claim that carbon dioxide controls climate change. They point to solar, cosmic and oceanic factors the agency ignores, and they note that higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon-dioxide spur plant growth and the greening of our planet. They also point out that human beings contribute only 4 percent of the carbon dioxide that enters the atmosphere each year, and U.S. coal-based power generation is responsible for only 3 percent of humanity's carbon-dioxide emissions.

In other words, the power plants the EPA wants to shut down account for a trivial 0.01 percent of the carbon dioxide added to Earth's atmosphere annually, which raise levels to about 0.04 percent of the atmosphere.

There has been no increase in average global temperatures in 16 years. No Category 3 or higher hurricane has hit the U.S. mainland in eight years, and 2013 has spawned the fewest tornadoes in decades.

Making the EPA's rules even more preposterous, China, India, Russia and Brazil alone emit twice as much carbon dioxide as the United States. Therefore, even if the theory that carbon dioxide controls Earth's climate is correct, the new regulations will have no effect on climate change.

EPA justifications for expensive, job-killing regulations of mercury, soot and other emissions are equally questionable.

Moreover, countless other federal, state, local and international regulatory authorities are busy interpreting, implementing and imposing rules under thousands of laws, ordinances and treaties. The Competitive Enterprise Institute's Ten Thousand Commandments project calculates that federal rules alone cost American businesses and families $1.8 trillion in annual compliance costs. No one has estimated the enormous cumulative costs of all the multiple layers of rules on our innovation, job creation and retention, prosperity and pursuit of happiness. …

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The Heavy Price of Regulations; Rules Don't Make Sense When Their Costs Outweigh Their Benefits
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