Mayan Civilization Alive in Mexico

Manila Bulletin, October 30, 2013 | Go to article overview

Mayan Civilization Alive in Mexico


Cancun, Mexico (dpa) Tourists interested in Mexico's Mayan past can scramble over ruins, ride canoes and swim in subterranean rivers. The once flourishing Mayan civilization peaked around 900 AD and was centered in what is today southern Mexico and Guatemala but its influence can still be seen throughout much of Central America. The Mayan people built vast cities, ornate temples, and towering pyramids. The Mayans also transported huge amounts of goods between Central and Northern America. A variety of trade goods were transported along the Yucatan Peninsula using huge dugout canoes that stayed close to the coastline and took advantage of sea currents and tides. They also travelled inland, navigating through canals, lagoons, swamps and lakes. Visitors to the region can now learn more about Mayan society with a trip to a colourful theme park around 80 kilometres south of Cancun called Xcaret, where the ancient Maya port of Pole once stood. Xcaret boasts pyramids, museums, theatres and huge karst caves where underground rivers from the interior flow out into the sea. The Mexican tourist industry has made efforts in recent years to offer visitors the opportunity to experience the country's extensive culture and history. …

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