Historic Evidence Shows That Jews Asked Arabs to Stay in Israel

Cape Times (South Africa), January 14, 2013 | Go to article overview

Historic Evidence Shows That Jews Asked Arabs to Stay in Israel


BYLINE: Dov Segev Steinberg.

It seems as if it is Dr Paul Hendler ("Please get facts right about Israel, the Arabs and the contested land," Cape Times Letters, January 9) who needs to get his facts right.

Let me assist. Dr Hendler states "that there is no evidence of widespread calls from neighbouring Arab states for the people to flee - if anything, there were calls to stay".

I will provide Dr Hendler with the evidence he so sadly lacks by quoting directly from Arab and objective sources at the time before revisionists such as Dr Hendler attempted to change history. The calls to stay were - by the Jews!

"Of the 62 000 Arabs who formerly lived in Haifa not more than 5 000 or 6 000 remained. The most potent of the factors were the announcements made over the air by the Higher Arab Executive, urging the Arabs to quit. It was clearly intimated that those Arabs who remained in Haifa and accepted Jewish protection would be regarded as renegades." - The London weekly Economist, October 2, 1948

"It must not be forgotten that the Arab Higher Committee encouraged the refugees' flight from their homes in Jaffa, Haifa, and Jerusalem." - Near East Arabic Broadcasting Station, Cyprus, April 3, 1949

"The mass evacuation, prompted partly by fear, partly by order of Arab leaders, left the Arab quarter of Haifa a ghost city... By withdrawing Arab workers, their leaders hoped to paralyse Haifa." - Time, May 3, 1948.

"The Arab States encouraged the Palestine Arabs to leave their homes temporarily in order to be out of the way of the Arab invasion armies". - Falastin (Jordanian newspaper), February 19, 1949.

"We will smash the country with our guns and obliterate every place the Jews seek shelter in. The Arabs should conduct their wives and children to safe areas until the fighting has died down." - Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri Said, quoted in Sir Am Nakbah ("The Secret Behind the Disaster") by Nimr el Hawari, Nazareth, 1952.

"The Arab governments told us: Get out so that we can get in. So we got out, but they did not get in." - from the Jordan daily Ad Difaa, September 6, 1954.

"The Arab civilians panicked and fled ignominiously. Villages were frequently abandoned before they were threatened by the progress of war." - General Glubb Pasha, in the London Daily Mail on August 12, 1948.

"The Arabs of Haifa fled in spite of the fact that the Jewish authorities guaranteed their safety and rights as citizens of Israel." - Monsignor George Hakim, Greek Catholic Bishop of Galilee, according to Rev. …

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