Thatcher Talk: How the Dog Ate My Homework for a New Era

Cape Times (South Africa), April 12, 2013 | Go to article overview

Thatcher Talk: How the Dog Ate My Homework for a New Era


I wish Madiba would die - Jansen. Just when you think you know someone, you read a newspaper headline and that someone turns out to be a cold-blooded icon killer. I was wondering how cruel some people could be and then I read this report from Reuters: "It is with great sadness that Mark and Carol Thatcher announced that their mother Baroness Thatcher died peacefully following a stroke this morning," Lord Tim Bell said.

I know the Iron Lady wasn't well liked (especially by miners) but when her own erstwhile minors are sad that she didn't suffer a painful death? That even makes Jonathan Jansen seem like a kind guy.

Of course, like Jansen, Thatcher's kids will claim that they were taken out of context. Taken out of context is the new the dog ate my homework.

News of Thatcher's death spread to social media platforms and continued to be taken out of context, causing much havoc. The Twitter hashtag #nowthatcherisdead got Cher's fans all freaked out. The musician's groupies read "now Thatcher is dead" as "now that Cher is dead".

Cher didn't seem too fazed that news of her death had been greatly exaggerated - maybe because she knows that there is love after life. She responded the following day with a casual "Hey" tweet.

It must be a first that a hashtag doubles up as a crossword clue: Now that Cher is dead (8).

The Iron Lady's death inspired the great Twitter cruciverbalist @aclueday to compile this clue: She died in bloodbath at Chernobyl (8).

The following day @aclueday came up with this gem: Perhaps, Lady Thatcher, we play here? (7,7)*

It's astonishing how one woman has polarised the world. For some she's Thatcher Thatcher Milk Snatcher, a pro-apartheid demon whose death should be celebrated. For the other half she's Iron Lady Maggie, a formidable politician who rescued Britain and whose life should be celebrated. …

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