Belting, Hans. Florence and Baghdad, Renaissance Art and Arab Science

By Armstrong, Reed | The Review of Metaphysics, September 2013 | Go to article overview

Belting, Hans. Florence and Baghdad, Renaissance Art and Arab Science


Armstrong, Reed, The Review of Metaphysics


BELTING, Hans. Florence and Baghdad, Renaissance Art and Arab Science. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2011. 304pp. Cloth, $39.95--In this finely produced and handsomely illustrated book, Professor Hans Belting, professor of Art History and Media Theory at the Academy of design in Karlesruhe, Germany, presents a scholarly account of the influence of early studies on optics by the Arabian mathematician, Alhazen (965-1040 A.D.) and their later influence on Italian Renaissance art, as well as bearing on further Western concepts of human perception and epistemology.

The book opens with an examination of the notion of "perspective" in the narrowest sense of the word. In general English usage, the word perspective is used to signify a particular point of view as in, "From an historical perspective ...," or as, "putting things in their proper perspective." Art Historians may speak of the "atmospheric perceptive" used by Leonardo DaVinci in which cooler colors are used to portray objects at a great distance, or "hieratic perspective" used in both Medieval and Oriental art where the more important personages are rendered larger than the rest, but Belting refers exclusively to the "mathematical perspective," described in Alhazen's original work on optics as titled in the Medieval Latin translation Perspectiva.

In his work, Alhazen describes his experiments using a Camera Obscura, or darkened chamber with a small peep hole, and the aid of mirrors to prove that light traveled in straight lines (foreshadowing the work of Kepler and Descartes some 600 years later). From these studies he reversed the classical optical theory that the eye emitted energy in order to perceive objects, to a theory that physical light rays were reflected from a multitude of points on objects, and that these rays travelled in straight lines to the curvature of the eyeball and were thus transmitted to the brain. Alhazen had no interest in art, only the transmission and geometry of light. Given the Moslem prohibition of depicting images of living (breathing) creatures as counterfeits infringing on the unique prerogative of Allah, this neglect is understandable. Moslem art did, however, develop according to Alhazen's theories in the beautiful geometric patterns seen throughout the Arab world as in the manuscripts, painting, and the three dimensional stucco work called Muqarnas, found in the Middle and Far East, as well as in Granada and other sites in Andalusia.

It was in Renaissance Italy that Alhazen's Perspectiva finally produced fruit as a theory of art. With the advent of Humanism, the author tells us, the "individual human gaze" triumphed over the static theocentric world view of the Middle ages as to how man perceives the world.

The great Renaissance polymath, Leon Batista Alberti (1404-1472), was the first author to promote this transformation in his treatise on painting, Della Pittura. Alberti even used a winged human eye as his emblem. Based on the theories found in Alhazen's optics, Alberti stated that, "I will take from mathematics those things [of] which my subject is concerned. …

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