Ghost Stories, Tours Abound in Southern Cities

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

Ghost Stories, Tours Abound in Southern Cities


Byline: Associated Press

PENSACOLA, Fla. -- A doctor who used a guillotine to perform amputations, a wealthy family marred by insanity and a man murdered inside his sealed and boarded-up mansion are among the stories that frighten willing listeners who line up in towns throughout the South to tour supposedly haunted places.

From Charleston, S.C., to Atlanta to New Orleans and beyond, ghost tours are popular with tourists and locals alike, around Halloween and throughout the year. New Orleans has year-round tours of all the spooky sights in the Crescent City, and it is well-known in literature and popular culture through stories of vampires, witches and other supernatural creatures. But smaller Southern cities like Pensacola, Fla., and Mobile, Ala., are also touting their own haunted histories.

"I think we are the gothic part of the country. We have a lot of skeletons in our closets, here in the South," said Diane Roberts, a professor of literature at Florida State University and author of books on Southern literature and culture.

She believes the region has produced so many famous authors with a focus on the supernatural because the South has such a deep and conflicted past.

"Ghosts can be a metaphor, and the South has a history of grinding poverty, slavery, war and genocide of native people," she said. "We are collectively very guilty and haunted by our past in this region."

Tamara Roberts, a longtime guide for ghost tours organized by the Pensacola Historical Society, agrees there is something special about Southerners and their relationship with the dead.

"These were our neighbors, our people so to speak," said Roberts, as she weaved her way through the rows of tombstones at the historic St. Michael's Cemetery in downtown Pensacola on a recent afternoon. "Ghost stories are popular all over the world, but I think there is a little of something in the South that, to me, goes back to family and community."

Pensacola dates back to 1559 when Tristan De Luna and his Spanish fleet landed on the white sand beaches. De Luna briefly attempted to build a settlement, but it was washed away in a hurricane. …

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