Beyond the Border: A New Chapter in North American Trade

By Owens, William L. | Canada-United States Law Journal, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Beyond the Border: A New Chapter in North American Trade


Owens, William L., Canada-United States Law Journal


INTRODUCTION

In today's increasingly connected and global market, North -America's ability to move pre-approved, low risk travelers and goods across its borders both safely and efficiently is crucial to the continent's economic competitiveness. The development of technologically advanced processes and enhanced regulatory collaboration along the United States-Canada border is critical to expanding American-made goods and services in consumer markets in Canada and throughout the world.

On December 7, 2011, President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Harper announced an Action Plan for Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness ("Plan"). (2) This joint partnership between the United States and Canada will expedite the movement of people and goods across the northern border while enhancing security. The Plan focuses on four key areas of cooperation: 1) addressing threats early; 2) trade facilitation, economic growth, and jobs; 3) integrated cross-border law enforcement; and 4) critical infrastructure and cybersecurity. (3) Responsibility for implementation and oversight of the Plan falls to the Beyond the Border Working Group, which is composed of representatives from the relevant federal agencies of both countries. (4) The two governments also commit to enhancing the existing Binational Port Operations Committees by creating additional local committees at the eight international airports in Canada that provide U.S. pre-clearance. (5)

The Plan is a significant milestone in the United States-Canada relationship. Canada is the United States' largest trading partner and an important NATO ally. The 5,525-mile shared border is the longest international border in the world. (6) In 2010, bilateral trade between the United States and Canada rose to nearly $645 billion with more than $1.7 billion crossing the border each day. (7) Last year alone, Canada imported more than $280.9 billion in goods and $56 billion in services from the United States, making it the nation's largest export market and the top export destination for 35 U.S. states. (8)

This trading relationship supports an estimated eight million U.S. jobs, with Canadian-owned companies responsible for employing over 500,000 American workers. (9) In the 21st congressional district alone, there are 13 border crossings that are responsible for the movement of more than $13 billion in annual bilateral trade, supporting nearly 20,000 jobs in the region and more than 500,000 jobs across the State of New York. (10) The movement of commercial goods and people across the northern border is one of the critical issues we face in terms of economic development from Jefferson County, New York to Clinton County, New York and throughout the Northeast Corridor of the United States. Conversely, the risks of not investing now in greater efficiencies, infrastructure, and technological improvements at the border will cede economic opportunities to competitors in the European Union and the comparatively high growth economies in the so-called BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). According to Garry Douglas, Executive Director of the North Country Chamber of Commerce in Plattsburgh, New York, the Plan, represents a "major commitment to addressing threats beyond the U.S.-Canada perimeter, relieving pressure on our shared border and enhancing the flow of goods and people." (11) Clearly, it is critical that policy makers and private industry stakeholders understand and engage in implementation of the Plan.

One of the most significant initiatives under the Plan is a commitment to negotiate a pre-clearance agreement for land, rail, and sea. This agreement will provide the legal framework necessary for U.S. Customs and Border Protection ("CBP") and the Canada Border Services Agency ("CBSA") to carry out cross-border traffic inspections. (12) The central goal of the Plan is to move both countries in the direction of an integrated entry-exit system whereby clearance and inspection by authorities in one country will ultimately serve as entry into the other. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Beyond the Border: A New Chapter in North American Trade
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.