The Magic Triangle of Employee Engagement: A New Study Provides a Model for Organizations, Management, and Employees to Work Together

By Gaul, Patty | Talent Development, November 2013 | Go to article overview

The Magic Triangle of Employee Engagement: A New Study Provides a Model for Organizations, Management, and Employees to Work Together


Gaul, Patty, Talent Development


A Human Capital Institute/Achievers study reports that a coordinated effort between an organization, its senior managers, and the employee is required to drive employee engagement. As the U.S. economy continues its recovery, the stakes for employers are rising: Employees who are not engaged, now that they have greater prospects, are looking for opportunities elsewhere.

Increased engagement levels lead to greater productivity, dedication, and performance in a workplace. Engaged employees generate success for a company, which increases profitability. They also tend to stay at a company long term, reducing an organization's costs for initial training and getting employees up to full capacity.

Highly engaged and low-engaged employees differ in their willingness to give maximum effort (93 percent versus 69 percent), to go above and beyond what is expected of them (94 percent versus 69 percent), and to work more hours than expected (82 percent versus 60 percent). Still, all workers want to do well in their jobs, the study found. More than 90 percent of both highly engaged (99 percent) and low-engaged employees (94 percent) responded in the affirmative to the statement "My job performance is important to me."

The research found that the employee most likely to be highly engaged is male, has 15 years with the organization, is 50 years or older, works with a small team, and holds a senior leader role. Since not all of these variables can be targeted, the report emphasizes that "addressing engagement among younger, shorter-tenured employees who are not in leadership positions should be a priority. …

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