The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Games Have a New Fire; like Watching a Bloodier Version of It's A Knockout

Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia), November 16, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Games Have a New Fire; like Watching a Bloodier Version of It's A Knockout


Byline: Geoffrey MacNab

THE second instalment of the Hunger Games franchise is an improvement on its predecessor.

This is a darker, more mature film which accentuates further the Orwellian elements in the Suzanne Collins novels from which it is adapted.

It benefits from another full-blooded performance from Jennifer Lawrence as the tough, single-minded warrior heroine Katniss Everdeen.

There is strong support, too, from a cast which now includes Philip Seymour Hoffman as Plutarch Heavensbee, the duplicitous new "games maker".

It's just a pity that when the battle finally starts, you again have the feeling you're watching a bloodier version of It's A Knockout - a glorified games show rather than a proper movie.

As the story begins, Katniss is back home in District 12 after winning the 74th Hunger Games. Her family and the other residents of the district still live in abject poverty.

The ruthless and cynical President Snow (Donald Sutherland) wants her to go on a "victory tour" and to try to fool the masses that she is deeply in love with her co-survivor from the Games Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson).

Francis Lawrence (taking over directorial duties from Gary Ross) accentuates the brutality in the early scenes.

President Snow is a fascist leader. Katniss is in the unfortunate position of being a poster girl for a regime she loathes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire Games Have a New Fire; like Watching a Bloodier Version of It's A Knockout
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.