False Parity between Mental and Physical Health Care; Now Expensive Treatments Will Become a Substitute for Willpower

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 18, 2013 | Go to article overview

False Parity between Mental and Physical Health Care; Now Expensive Treatments Will Become a Substitute for Willpower


Byline: Richard E. Vatz, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

For decades, the mental health fields have been fighting for the gold standard in coverage of mental disorders: parity with physical illnesses.

The extension of federal policy was announced by Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius along with decades-long supporter Rosalynn Carter earlier this month. The new rules combine the intent of the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act with Obamacare regulations to yield virtually unlimited mental health care to anyone diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. If mental health providers diagnose mental illness, co-payments, deductibles and lifelong coverage will be comparable to those afforded patients with diagnosed genuine medical illnesses.

The arguments against such expanded coverage have always focused on its invalidity, unintended social consequences and the costs of mental illness treatment, both drug and talk therapy.

Throughout the past half-century, there has been considerable debate over whether most mental disorders are actually physical, neurological illnesses.

While many critics of equating mental illness with physical illness were unwilling to concede that even the most extreme mental states and behaviors - such as some schizophrenias - were authentic medical illnesses, a substantial portion of the general public infers that everyday problems have the same likely neurochemical link as severe mental illness.

In addition, many people think that psychological problems of children, whether or not they are real physical diseases, are sufficiently poignant to justify being termed illnesses which deserve third-party payments. The exponential increases of diagnoses of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder over the past several decades have thus engendered limited criticism.

While a few serious psychiatric-medical disorders (they are not called diseases in psychiatry's diagnostic manual) such as major depression may warrant lifelong coverage, many, if not most, of the hundreds of diagnoses therein surely do not. Merely disturbed patients may be diagnosed as having adjustment disorder, "social phobias" or many of the other catch-all diagnoses. Providing them lengthy and expensive attention and treatment may be a lot of things, but it is not necessary medical support. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

False Parity between Mental and Physical Health Care; Now Expensive Treatments Will Become a Substitute for Willpower
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.