Putting NSA Spying in Perspective; Snowden's Revelations Won't Diminish the Agency's National Security Contributions

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 18, 2013 | Go to article overview

Putting NSA Spying in Perspective; Snowden's Revelations Won't Diminish the Agency's National Security Contributions


Byline: James A. Lyons, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The current uproar over National Security Agency (NSA) activities both in this country and internationally as a result of Edward Snowden's treasonous conduct has caused undue focus on U.S. intelligence capabilities to the net detriment of our national security. Sensitive intelligence leaks by Mr. Snowden have received wide coverage by European media under the byline of the hard-left activist Glenn Greenwald. Their objective seems to be to curtail U.S. superior intelligence-collection capabilities, which has kept us safe since Sept. 11, 2001.

Mr. Snowden's leaks have left a false impression that the NSA is violating international norms, which clearly is not the case. Every major country is conducting similar electronic monitoring. For example, Former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright recently stated that she knew the French were intercepting her private conversations when she was our U.N. ambassador. She went on to state that this should not be a surprise to anyone - countries routinely spy on each other. Therefore, the French outrage as expressed by French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius that this is an assault on privacy and totally unacceptable is particularly galling. Former French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner said, Everyone is listening to everyone else.

It should come as no surprise that both Russia and China maintain extensive intelligence-collection capabilities. In a shocking revelation, the now-deceased Russian President Boris Yeltsin related in the second volume of his memoirs that in 1996, he received a classified cable from Russian intelligence reporting that President Clinton was having a potentially dangerous sexual relationship with intern Monica Lewinsky. Yeltsin wrote that he pondered whether and how to exploit this intelligence. We know that this explosive intelligence got back to the Oval Office. The tipoff came from Miss Lewinsky, who in sworn testimony stated that in late March 1997, Mr. Clinton called her to the White House and stated he had reason to think that his phone conversations were being intercepted by a foreign embassy. He proposed that he and Monica come up with cover stories for their phone sex. The Kremlin knew, and Mr. Clinton knew the Kremlin knew. This raises the question of what impact did this have on Mr. Clinton's policies toward Russia. Was the transfer of $4.6 billion in hard cash by the International Monetary Fund in 1998, with Mr. Clinton's support reportedly over the objections of then-Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers to the Russian Central Bank (which was promptly stolen), related in any way to this intercept?

Since we know Russia had intercepts of the president's phone sex, we have to assume China, with its aggressive cybercapability, could have also known. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Putting NSA Spying in Perspective; Snowden's Revelations Won't Diminish the Agency's National Security Contributions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.