Work-Linked Education: A Curriculum Reform Process in Vocational Education for Youths Empowerment towards Nation Building

By Famiwole, Remigius O.; Bamidele, Samuel O. et al. | Research Journal in Organizational Psychology and Educational Studies (RJOPES), September 2013 | Go to article overview

Work-Linked Education: A Curriculum Reform Process in Vocational Education for Youths Empowerment towards Nation Building


Famiwole, Remigius O., Bamidele, Samuel O., Oke, Jonathan O., Research Journal in Organizational Psychology and Educational Studies (RJOPES)


INTRODUCTION

The value of schooling and vocational education depends on the ability of an individual in the school to use his education or training in gainful employment. Thus teaching and learning process in schools and colleges need to be carried out to a point where students have assets in skill and knowledge that can be sold to employers. This is because for every occupation that the graduates will take up after leaving the school there is a minimum of productive ability which they must posses in order to secure employment. If education is not carried out to that point by the schools, there is bound to be mass unemployment as we have in Nigeria today. For instance, in 2010, Olaitan defined Vocational technical education as any form of education whose primary purpose is to prepare persons for employment in a recognized occupation. Vocational technical education according to Olaitan, provides the skills, knowledge and attitudes necessary for employment in a specific occupation. Similarly Okorie (2000), posited that any education which is necessary for effective employment in an occupation is vocational. The main function of vocational education therefore is to provide knowledge, develop skill and inculcate the attitude that are required for entry into and progress in such areas as Agriculture, Home Economics, Technical Education or Business Trades/Education.

Olaitan noted that vocational education programmes assumes that a choice of an occupation has made while in school and that appropriate training is needed to enable the individual to enter or advance in his chosen occupation. He opined that the success of any vocational education curriculum in making substantial contribution to the economy of the nation therefore depends on the effective teaching and learning of the psychomotor and affective domains of learning as against cognitive domain, which emphasizes mostly the knowledge. Cognitive domain involves the mental process and activities, while the psychomotor domain involves manipulative skills. It includes the abilities to perception, the preparatory set or readiness, habit response, complex motor response, adaptation of motor response and origination of new motor responses. Similarly, the affective domain involves attitude and feelings and includes abilities related to valuing certain things, organizing system of values and developing an internal consistent system of values (Mkpa, 1989)

The three domain of learning are important in an ideal teaching and learning situation. It has been observed that most of the teaching which takes place in Nigerian schools emphasizes only the cognitive domain of learning and liberal education at the expense of skill development and functional education. Olaitan (1996) remarked that this type of liberal education encourage students to learn the content of the curriculum through rote learning from the textbooks, with only the tendency to describe necessary concepts, equipment and procedures, and recite the skills but not being able to perform any one of them.

The consequence of rote learning and the existing learning experience in Nigerian schools is mat the students are made to memorize theories and principles with little or no practical or relation to how the theories could be applied to solve any problem in any work or job area. Hence, most students graduate from schools and colleges without any appreciable saleable skills or aptitude with which they can be employed.

No doubt there are millions of secondary and college graduate roaming the nation's cities and urban areas, jobless and "unskilled". They are neither employed nor employable. Not necessary because there is no vacancy or resources with which they can start a job but most importantly because they are very ill prepared and unskilled to be absorbed into the nations workforce.

Okorie (2000) stressed that the present trend in Nigeria where school leavers and graduates are seen jobless and roaming the street called for a reexamination of the vocational technical education curriculum planning and implementation strategies in Nigerian schools. …

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