Analysis: Selfies Take over the Internet

Manila Bulletin, November 20, 2013 | Go to article overview

Analysis: Selfies Take over the Internet


New York, United States (AP)In these hyper-connected, over-shared times dwell two kinds of people: those preoccupied with taking and uploading photos of themselves and those who have never heard of the selfie. The raunchy, goofy, poignant, sexy, or drunken self-portrait has been a common sight since phone camera met social media. Now, nearly a decade since the arm-extended or in-the-mirror photos became a mainstay of MySpace, duck face or otherwise, selfies are a pastime across generations and cultures. Justin Bieber puts up plenty with his shirt off and Rihanna poses for sultry snaps, but a beaming Hillary Clinton recently took a turn with daughter Chelsea, who tweeted their happy first attempt with the hashtag (hash)ProudDaughter. Two other famous daughters, Sasha and Malia Obama, selfied at dad's second inauguration, pulling faces in front of a smartphone. And Japanese astronaut Aki Hoshide earned a spot in the Selfie Hall of Fame with a striking, other-worldly shot, arms extended as reflected in his helmet outside the International Space Station last year. ''It just comes so naturally after a point,'' said Elizabeth Zamora, a 24-year-old marketing account coordinator in Dallas who has taken hundreds of selfies since she got her first iPhone two years ago, with the front-facing camera that has become the selfie gold standard. ''You just take it and you don't even realize it and then you're sharing it with all your friends,'' she said. ''I try not to go crazy.'' If we're not taking them, we're certainly looking, regardless of whether we know what they're called. We're lurking on the selfies of our teens, enjoying the hijinx of co-workers and friends and mooning over celebrities, who have fast learned the marketing value; and scandalous dangers, of capturing their more intimate, unpolished selves. The practice of freezing and sharing our thinnest slices of life has become so popular that the granddaddy of dictionaries, the Oxford, is monitoring the term selfie as a possible addition. Time magazine included the selfie in its Top 10 buzzwords of 2012 (at No. 9) and New York magazine's The Cut blog declared in April: ''Ugly Is the New Pretty: How Unattractive Selfies Took Over the Internet.'' On Instagram alone, there's (hash)selfiesunday, along with related tags where millions of selfies land daily. More than 23 million photos have been uploaded to the app with the tag (hash)selfie and about 70 million photos clog Instagram's (hash)me. What are we to make of all this navel-gazing (sometimes literally)? Are selfies, by definition, culturally dangerous? Offensive? An indicator of moral decline? Beverly Hills, Calif., psychiatrist Carole Lieberman sees narcissism with a capital N. ''The rise of the selfie is a perfect metaphor for our increasingly narcissistic culture. …

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