Shining an Appreciative Light on Anarchism

By McCarthy, Colman | National Catholic Reporter, November 8, 2013 | Go to article overview

Shining an Appreciative Light on Anarchism


McCarthy, Colman, National Catholic Reporter


Uh-oh. There's that word again: Anarchy. Run. Hide. Call the swat teams. Etymologically, the word has been encrusted with as many definitions as the hordes of citizens who gathered in New York City's Zuccotti Park for two months and beyond in the fall of 2011. The park, a square block in Manhattan's financial district, was peopled by everyone from self-declared enemies of the state and the corporate oligarchy to fervent believers in the power of nonviolent mass protest to create justice-based communities. The grievances ranged from anger at being betrayed by government policies that favor the nation's 1 percent ruling elite to feelings of helplessness against an economic and political system that fails to meet human needs, ignores human rights, and dominates the 99 percent.

Some of those gathered at Zuccotti Park--as well as at similar demonstrations that sprouted in Washington, Los Angeles, Seattle, Boston and other cities around the world--would be pepper-sprayed by the police. Others would be dismissed by the corporate water boy media as naive idlers who should be growing organic kale in a Vermont commune, and all of them were mocked by Newt Gingrich as scruffies who need to take a bath and get a job.

Into the scene came Nathan Schneider, a 29-year-old reporter presciently realizing that this gathering of thousands of people was much more than a fleeting uprising of one-note anti-empire dissidents who saw too many Michael Moore movies and heard too many Noam Chomsky lectures. Taking it seriously, Schneider legworked, interviewed, observed, dug and analyzed. No amateur, his dispatches made their way into the pages of The Nation, Harper's, The New York Times, The Catholic Worker and the Internet's "Waging Nonviolence."

Schneider's prose is rich with metaphors, historical allusions and clearheaded reflections that reveal a writer hard at work to get it right. His panoptic reporting in Thank You, Anarchy brings to mind the work of George Orwell in Down and Out in Paris and London, the books of Robert Coles on his experiences as a psychiatrist in the South. and Norman Mailer's The Armies of the Night on the 1967 anti-war march in Washington.

Well aware that, along with pacifism, anarchism is one of the least understood and least appreciated philosophies, Schneider more than once tries to let the sun break through the clouds of misunderstanding. "It was common to think of the people at the center of this movement as being overly radical in one way or another," he writes, "when really the problem was more a matter of the world just not being habitable enough. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Shining an Appreciative Light on Anarchism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.