Turning the Green Earth Greener; Humanity Can Benefit from More Carbon Dioxide Rather Than Less

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Turning the Green Earth Greener; Humanity Can Benefit from More Carbon Dioxide Rather Than Less


Byline: H. Leighton Steward, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Obama administration, through the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with its proposed regulations on stationary coal plants, continues to discourage the use of fossil fuels, owing to their release of long-sequestered carbon dioxide.

Thankfully, the Supreme Court is taking a hard look at whether its own decisions justify allowing the EPA to regulate stationary energy-producing facilities.

The assertion of a catastrophic warming impact by carbon dioxide is based on unvalidated climate-computer models and not real observations or the historical relationship of Earth's temperature and atmospheric carbon-dioxide levels. In adhering to this assertion, the administration is turning its back on the astonishing plant growth and life-saving benefits to Earth's atmosphere of additional carbon dioxide.

Doesn't everyone want robust habitats and ecosystems, bountiful food crops, lush forests and grasslands? The good news is that it is already happening. Humanity has been running a real, worldwide experiment for 150 years, and it's paying dividends. Mother Nature is responding positively to our real-life, albeit inadvertent, efforts.

What am I talking about? Human beings have been fertilizing Earth's greenery worldwide. Nitrogen-based fertilizer does not get spread in the vast forests, but it does run into the rivers and oceans with very negative effects. Humans have been raising the level of carbon dioxide, which has no negative effect on any plant or animal life. There is no instance of carbon dioxide being a pollutant - just ask any chemistry professor. Carbon dioxide is colorless, odorless and tasteless. The vapors shown billowing from the various smoke stacks are not carbon dioxide, although some may be present. The media imply that the colorful emissions they show is carbon dioxide pollution.

Since the gas is not a pollutant, what impact does it have? As we learned in the third grade, carbon dioxide is what plants eat. The more of it they eat, the faster and larger they grow, including food crops. It is also a mild greenhouse gas that helps warm the Earth somewhat. Most plants also respond favorably to a modest warming. …

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Turning the Green Earth Greener; Humanity Can Benefit from More Carbon Dioxide Rather Than Less
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