Business Spirit Works for California Business, Publisher Says

By Scala, Ted | Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management, November 1984 | Go to article overview

Business Spirit Works for California Business, Publisher Says


Scala, Ted, Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management


When Hershel D. Sinay took over as publisher and president of California Business in June 1979, he thought the magazine was so bad he didn't want to put his name on the masthead.

The title had been converted from a tabloid a year earlier, and Sinay felt that its managers, many of whom had newspaper backgrounds, lacked the sensitivity to produce a magazine that looked good and read well.

Sinay had walked in with a plan to overhaul the magazine totally by January 1980, but he decided he couldn't wait that long. Retaining those people from the old staff that he wanted to keep, he brought in some magazine experts whom he had worked with in the past and started to put his plan into effect.

"I put together a team that had magazine expertise, people who got along with me and whom I got along with," he recalled during a recent interview.

"I got that group together and I said, 'We're going to start on page one and when I finish today, you're going to be at that fourth cover and we'll have a new layout and a new look for this magazine,'" he recounted.

He continued: "That happened in mid-June. By August, I had a brand new magazine on the marketplace."

Today, five years later, Sinay obviously has little reluctance about putting his name on California Business' masthead.

Five years ago, California Business had a total circulation of 30,000, of which about 5,000 was paid. Today, thanks in large part to direct marketing, the magazine has a guaranteed circulation of 70,000, with 65,000 paid, making it the largest paid-circulation regional business publication in the country.

In May, the Los Angeles-based magazine reported record advertising income for the first quarter of 1984. Display advertising revenue was up 69 percent from the same period in 1983.

Also in May, California Business won a record seven Maggie Awards at the annual banquet of the Western Publications Association.

Trim, well-spoken and an enthusiastic booster of his product, Sinay, now, 46, graduated from the University of Southern California in 1960 with a degree in telecommunications and went to work as an advertising trainee for CBS in Television City, California.

Six months later, he left CBS, and then held a succession of advertising jobs, including a three-year stint as an advertising representative for The Wall Street Journal.

For 1966 to 1972 he worked for Performing Arts Magazine, where he was director of sales, and from 1972 to 1979 he worked for East/West Network Inc., publishers of in-flight magazines. He was vice president for publishing services and associate publisher at East/West when he was hired at California Business by Martin Stone, who had bought California Business News Inc., the magazine's parent, two years earlier. Stone acts as chairman of the board for the overall company.

Explaining the growth of regional business magazines in recent years--the Association of Area Business Publications estimates that, on average, one new regional business magazine or newspaper is started each month--Sinay points to a number of changes in society that helped create more of a demand for business news.

In recent years, he comments, there have been recessions and periods of inflation, geographic decentralization of industry, a shift from smokestack industries to informational and service businesses and a geographic redistribution of the country's population.

"We have a very confused general public and people who are really demanding a tremendous amount of information so that they can at least keep earning more money, hold onto it and make proper investments and proper business decisions," he says.

He continues: "The national publications can not devote the same amount of pages, times and energy to providing every local or regional area of our country with information as can somebody based there."

California Business, he says, has been in a particularly good position because California has the biggest consumer and business market in the country. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Business Spirit Works for California Business, Publisher Says
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.