The Current State of Teacher Hiring: Many School Systems Lack the Means to Evaluate Teacher Effectiveness

By Fraynd, Don | District Administration, November 2013 | Go to article overview

The Current State of Teacher Hiring: Many School Systems Lack the Means to Evaluate Teacher Effectiveness


Fraynd, Don, District Administration


Teachers are the single most important factor in student learning. Yet, our field as a whole spends little time ensuring that only the best teachers enter our classrooms--and even less time ensuring that the best teachers feel supported.

In reality, many schools don't have evaluation systems or performance measures in place to assess whether or not teachers are effective. In its study, "The Widget Effect," The New Teacher Project explores "the tendency of school districts to assume classroom effectiveness is the same from teacher to teacher." The study reports that most urban districts give 99 percent of teachers a satisfactory rating. The lack of objectivity in evaluating teacher performance is problematic, since districts must be able to define and identify what makes an effective teacher prior to the hiring process.

Despite the current lack of systems to measure performance, the data to do so is available. Education has a research base that rivals any field, and hundreds of studies have shown us what matters in terms of teaching effectiveness.

However, these studies have been hard to distill and actualize into a program or tool that busy educational leaders can use in making decisions about hiring and teacher development.

Hiring challenges

Given national policy and the current status of the teaching pool, the need to find and hire the best teachers has never been greater. Consider these issues:

* More teachers needed. Public school enrollment is expected to reach record highs with each passing year through at least 2017. What's more, nearly 50 percent of currently employed teachers expect to depart the profession within their first three to five years on the job.

* Teacher turnover and lack of qualified teachers. Urban and rural districts have many problems, from high teacher turnover to chronic shortages of qualified math, science, and technology teachers.

* Declining quality. Many believe that the quality of the average teacher has decreased as teachers' salaries have declined relative to those of other professions. It will be increasingly difficult for districts to compete for high-quality teachers.

* Educational policy. Recent changes introduced by Race to the Top legislation and similar policies are compelling many states to begin measuring the effectiveness of individual teachers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Current State of Teacher Hiring: Many School Systems Lack the Means to Evaluate Teacher Effectiveness
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.