Will Airlines Allow In-Flight Calls?

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 24, 2013 | Go to article overview

Will Airlines Allow In-Flight Calls?


Byline: Associated Press

NEW YORK -- The Federal Communications Commission might be ready to permit cellphone calls in flight. But what about the airlines?

Old concerns about electronics being a danger to airplane navigation have been debunked. And airlines could make some extra cash charging passengers to call a loved one from 35,000 feet. But that extra money might not be worth the backlash from fliers who view overly chatty neighbors as another inconvenience to go along with smaller seats and stuffed overhead bins.

"Common courtesy goes out the window when people step in that metal tube," says James Patrick II, a frequent flier from Newnan, Ga. "You think the debates and fistfights over reclining the seat back was bad. Wait until guys start slugging it out over someone talking too loud on the phone."

That's one of the reasons the country's largest flight attendant union has come out against allowing calls in flight. The FCC is proposing to lift an existing ban, and airlines would have to decide whether to let passengers make calls. The ban would remain in effect during takeoff and landing.

Delta Air Lines is the only major airline to explicitly state that voice calls won't be allowed on its flights, even if the FCC allows it. Delta says years of feedback from customers show "the overwhelming sentiment" is to continue prohibiting calls.

Other airlines aren't as firm.

United Airlines says that if the FCC changes its rules, "we will study it along with feedback from customers and crews." American Airlines has offered a similar approach. So has JetBlue, which says it would "welcome the opportunity to explore" voice calls but "would prioritize making the cabin comfortable and welcoming for all."

Confused yet?

Well, to complicate matters even more, the airlines actually don't need to wait for the FCC. Yes, the government would need to remove the restriction for you to make normal calls in flight. But there are already plenty of ways to make calls legally over airline Wi-Fi networks, while keeping your phone in "airplane mode." The airlines just choose to block such calls.

Just as many schools and workplaces block access to pornography websites, airlines use similar filters to block access to Skype and other Internet calling services.

Gogo Inc., which provides Internet access on American, Alaska Airlines, Delta, United, US Airways and Virgin America flights, recently announced a new service for passengers to send and receive text messages or make phone calls using Wi-Fi.

A U.S. airline Gogo wouldn't name will launch the service early next year with only text-messaging capabilities.

"We know that the talk portion for commercial aviation is not really something airlines or their passengers want," Gogo spokesman Steve Nolan says.

The talk function was designed for private jets and international airlines. Most Middle East airlines and a few in Asia and Europe already allow voice calls on planes.

Gogo's chief competitor, Global Eagle Entertainment Inc.'s Row 44, will debut gate-to-gate text service for $2 a flight on select Southwest Airlines aircraft Monday.

Tom Wheeler, who became the FCC's chairman three weeks ago, issued a statement Thursday saying that "modern technologies can deliver mobile services in the air safely and reliably and the time is right to review our outdated and restrictive rules." Travelers protested to the agency and on social media. …

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