From Protector to Destroyer; Overreaching Regulators Are Squeezing Liberty out of Existence

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 3, 2013 | Go to article overview

From Protector to Destroyer; Overreaching Regulators Are Squeezing Liberty out of Existence


Byline: Richard W. Rahn, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Did you ever buy a game or device for which the rule book or instruction manual was so thick and detailed that you were not able to comprehend it in a reasonable period of time, so you either discarded or failed to use the product?

Have you noticed that many government regulations are so complex and vague that it is impossible to know if you are in compliance? Examples are the 70,000-plus pages of Internal Revenue Service regulations and the reported 30,000-plus pages of Obamacare regulations. Who do you think has a self-interest in all this complexity and vagueness?

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Margaret Hamburg does not think you have the right to get a reading of your own DNA by sending a sample of your saliva to 23andMe, a company that has developed a genotype screening test. The following is from a letter the FDA sent to 23andMe: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is sending you this letter because you are marketing 23andMe Saliva Collection Kit and Personal Genome (PGS) without marketing clearance or approval in violation of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act). The FDA is unable to cite one example of users being harmed by voluntarily obtaining information about their own bodies. Still, the company was ordered to cease marketing its highly beneficial product last month.

The Food and Drug Administration was set up to protect us from consuming bad food or drugs. It has morphed into an agency that keeps potentially beneficial drugs from us, and now is even banning our ability to know what diseases to which we may be prone, and thus, blocking our ability to take potential corrective or preventative action. The FDA has gone from being a protector to a destroyer of health and liberty.

The IRS was set up to collect taxes. It now has become a government agent to deny the right of free and protected speech, as shown not only in the harassment of Tea Party groups, but in last week's sleazy action of demanding that certain (but not all) traditionally tax-exempt groups start providing their contributor lists to the IRS. Groups that most often stand for liberty and less government are the primary targets. What a coincidence.

One of the basic functions of money is to serve as a store of value, which the U.S. dollar did from 1789 until 1913 (despite occasional ups and downs, there was very little change in the wholesale-price level over that 125-year period). However, with the advent of the Federal Reserve in 1914, the dollar no longer serves as store of value, now being worth only about one-twenty-third of what it was worth in 1914. …

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