I Used to Take Take That for Granted. All of Us Did; Gary Barlow's at the Top of His Game - but He Still Worries It Will All End Tomorrow. the Singer, Songwriter and TV Talent Judge Tells ANDY WELCH about Being Friends with His Idol Elton John, New-Found Confidence and Cherishing Take That

Wales On Sunday (Cardiff, Wales), December 8, 2013 | Go to article overview

I Used to Take Take That for Granted. All of Us Did; Gary Barlow's at the Top of His Game - but He Still Worries It Will All End Tomorrow. the Singer, Songwriter and TV Talent Judge Tells ANDY WELCH about Being Friends with His Idol Elton John, New-Found Confidence and Cherishing Take That


Byline: Gary Barlow

WATCHING Gary Barlow on The X Factor, mentoring and dishing out advice to young hopefuls, it's hard to remember a time when he wasn't at the top of his game.

But as recently as 2005, the year the documentary Take That: For The Record aired, prompting the group's reunion almost a decade after they'd split, he was a faded force.

It seems ludicrous now, but when he, Howard Donald, Jason Orange and Mark Owen announced they were getting back together, there were sneers all round. The idea that the foursome could pick up where they left off, without Robbie Williams, who'd left the group prematurely to become one of the country's biggest-selling solo artists, seemed impossible.

One listen to Patience, their 2006 comeback single, and the sneers stopped.

But why the initial doubt? Songs Gary had penned, after all, had been among the biggest hits of the Nineties, breaking chart records left, right and centre.

His solo efforts during the group's break, though, hadn't been so successful...

His debut Open Road capitalised on his reputation as the 'real talent' in Take That, selling almost three million copies and spawning two No 1 singles. But with his follow-up, Twelve Months, Eleven Days, things spectacularly ground to a halt. It peaked at No 35 and fell out of the Top 100 a week later.

"I was in a rotten place back then," Gary says now.

"It was written by committee, that album, with (producer) Clive Davis in the US telling me who I should be and who I should work with, then the UK label telling me something different over here, and there's actually very little of me on there.

"I promised myself this time around that I wasn't going to listen to anyone else, or be swayed," he adds. "The first time the label heard the (new) album was when I'd finished it."

The new album is Since I Saw You Last, his first as a solo artist in 14 years. The title track, he says, is one of the most literal things he's written, summing up exactly where he, Robbie, Jason, Howard and Mark were, all that time ago.

"It's about where we are today, too," he continues. "It's a celebration, saying that even though all that stuff happened, it led us back here, to this great place we're at now."

There's a duet too, with his old pal Elton John.

"I'm in contact with him a lot, we've known each other about 20 years," he says, in a way that hints he still can't believe he's friends with his idol.

They see each other about four times a year, and most of their communication involves exchanging music recommendations, but when Gary had a song he thought they could sing together and sent it over, within 10 minutes he had an answer.

"He was on the phone, said it was a smash and wanted to record it as soon as possible," says Gary. "Three weeks later, we were in the studio playing the piano part together, recording the vocals in the same room. It's an old-fashioned duet in that sense, two people in the room together, and it was brilliant.

"He's my idol, Elton, he's the reason I sat at the piano in the first place, so to be in a studio with him as an equal is incredible. The funny thing is, the song's about that mutual respect. Needless to say, I'm very happy about it."

So what's different now, compared to 14 years ago? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

I Used to Take Take That for Granted. All of Us Did; Gary Barlow's at the Top of His Game - but He Still Worries It Will All End Tomorrow. the Singer, Songwriter and TV Talent Judge Tells ANDY WELCH about Being Friends with His Idol Elton John, New-Found Confidence and Cherishing Take That
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.