Muslims, Christians, and Jesus

By Marshall, David | Theological Studies, December 2013 | Go to article overview

Muslims, Christians, and Jesus


Marshall, David, Theological Studies


MUSLIMS, CHRISTIANS, AND JESUS. By Mona Siddiqui. New Haven, Yale University, 2013. Pp. 285. $32.50.

Three distinguished Christian scholars, including Rowan Williams, provide glowing tributes on the dust-jacket of this new book by Siddiqui, a professor at Edinburgh University, a leading Muslim supporter of interfaith dialogue, and a gifted communicator noted particularly for her contributions to BBC Radio's Thought for the Day.

Certainly we can easily understand the appeal of this book to Christians committed to dialogue with Muslims. S. covers a number of topics at the core of the theological encounter between Christianity and Islam, such as the nature of prophecy, the identities and roles of Jesus and Mary, the relationship between law and love, and the cross. Throughout the volume it is apparent that S. has read much more widely in Christian theology than is common among Muslims, even Muslims who take part regularly in dialogue with Christians. She is able to present what Christians have written about Islam with a fair degree of objectivity, even when dealing with material that many Muslims would feel obliged to excoriate, such as Barth's dismissive account of the God of Islam in his Dogmatics, or the negative comments of missionaries like Samuel Zwemer (1867-1952). That S. has made the effort to listen with real empathy to Christians is most clear in her concluding "Reflections on the Cross," where she records the personal reflections from Christian friends on what the Cross means to them. Although she cannot share their perspectives fully, she is moved by their testimony and speaks of what she has learned from it. She thus sets an impressive example of attending to the account that Christians, past and present, have given of their own faith.

Reading the three positive Christian commendations, questions that occur to me are" Why is there no accompanying commendation by a Muslim? Does the book appeal more to Christians than to Muslims? That might well be so. It shows a refreshing sympathy for Christian beliefs and what these signify in the hearts of Christians that goes far beyond what is commonly found in Muslim writings on Christianity. But it is surprising that S. provides no balancing comments to show that the book also had the respect of one or two significant Muslim scholars. Therefore we might naturally ask, How representative of Muslim thought is this book? If it is not representative, perhaps that is because S. is mapping territory where few other Muslim scholars have gone. It will be interesting and important, however, to know what other Muslims make of S.'s approach, her account of Muslim positions, and also the responses to Christianity that she articulates.

However, while the very fact that such a book has been written by a Muslim scholar is to be warmly welcomed, I have to acknowledge that my expectations were not entirely fulfilled. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Muslims, Christians, and Jesus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.