Unsettled Tax Rules Create Trying Times for Homeowners, Investors

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 13, 2013 | Go to article overview

Unsettled Tax Rules Create Trying Times for Homeowners, Investors


WASHINGTON -- For one of the least productive congressional sessions in modern history, the final word about tax reform last week was entirely in character: Nothing's happening.

But is that good news or bad news for homeowners, buyers and small-scale real estate investors? A bit of both.

When House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp, a Republican from Michigan, announced that not only will he not reveal the details of his long-awaited comprehensive tax reform bill this year, but he also will not seek passage of a so-called "extenders" bill for expiring tax code benefits, it was a sweet-and-sour mix for real estate interests.

Camp's big reform bill, which would attempt to lower individual and corporate income tax rates to a maximum of 25 percent, is expected to call for significant cutbacks -- possibly elimination -- of prized real estate deductions for home mortgage interest, local property taxes and other write-offs in order to pay for lower marginal rates. With major changes like these now pushed back well into 2014 for even preliminary debate -- in the middle of a re-election year for Congress -- homeownership advocates are at least moderately relieved.

But there's a key negative here as well: The failure of tax writers to put together an extenders bill means important expiring Internal Revenue Code provisions affecting large numbers of homeowners -- especially relief from taxation on mortgage debt forgiveness by lenders in most states, plus current deductions for mortgage insurance premiums and energy-saving home improvements -- will lapse Dec. 31. California owners are not affected by the debt forgiveness expiration because state law exempts them from taxation when lenders cancel mortgage principal debt as part of short sales. The IRS has announced that it will not levy taxes on such transactions in California even if the federal exemption for owners elsewhere expires.

Complicating matters even more: Though they were tucked away in eye-glazing discussion drafts and attracted little attention before Thanksgiving, Senate tax writers' reform-bill proposals for real estate should be unsettling for anyone owning residential investment property, such as rental houses.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus, a Montana Democrat, would terminate one of the oldest financial planning techniques used by real estate investors -- tax-deferred exchanges under Section 1031 of the code. …

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Unsettled Tax Rules Create Trying Times for Homeowners, Investors
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