Turnover Turnabout; in Reversal, Differential Working against Team This Year

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 17, 2013 | Go to article overview

Turnover Turnabout; in Reversal, Differential Working against Team This Year


Byline: Zac Boyer, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Washington Redskins coach Mike Shanahan has often equated a positive turnover margin to team success, noting that the best teams in the league are the ones who give the ball away the least and take it away the most.

With only two games remaining, the Redskins stand at a paltry 3-11, the second-worst team in the league by virtue of the standings and tiebreakers. After turning the ball over seven times on Sunday in a 27-26 road loss to the Atlanta Falcons, they are the owners of a woeful minus-8 turnover margin, the sixth-worst mark in the league.

Bad teams play sloppy football. But what makes the Redskins' deficiencies even more eye-opening is that they ranked No. 3 in the NFL last season in that very same category, finishing with a net differential of 17 turnovers.

Washington returned all but one starter from a year ago, and on defense, an emphasis was placed on acquiring players who had a penchant for forcing turnovers. Yet the lack of surehandedness, on both sides of the ball, is alarming.

That's really hard to put a finger on, Shanahan said Monday. That's one of the reasons why we've had the record we've had.

Robert Griffin III threw only five interceptions last season, displaying an acute awareness unbecoming of a player in his first year. Only 1.27 percent of his passes were intercepted - a rookie record.

Griffin's accuracy took a significant dip this year, and before being shut down by the team last week to keep him healthy for the offseason, he had thrown 12 interceptions over 13 games. Not once last year did he throw multiple interceptions in one game; he did so twice this season, including in the season-opening loss to the Philadelphia Eagles.

That interception percentage increased this year to 2.63 percent, which is just shy of the 2.67 percent league average for starting quarterbacks. Kirk Cousins, who threw two interceptions Sunday in place of Griffin, has thrown seven career interceptions on 118 attempts, or 5.93 percent of his passes.

Cousins said after the game Sunday that the interceptions came on similar routes, and he didn't lead either of his wide receivers, Aldrick Robinson or Pierre GarE*on, far enough away from their defenders.

I think I saw right, Cousins said. I think he was open on both occasions. I think the ball just needed to be thrown three, four, five yards further in and it's a completion and we're moving the chains. That's something I would like to think I would never do again. Every in-cut I ever throw now will be where it needs to be.

The Redskins also were hampered by turnovers committed by players who normally don't do so. Wide receiver Santana Moss lost two fumbles, including a muffed punt in the second quarter, marking the first time he's lost a fumble all season. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Turnover Turnabout; in Reversal, Differential Working against Team This Year
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.