Army War College Debates Erasing Confederate History

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 18, 2013 | Go to article overview

Army War College Debates Erasing Confederate History


Byline: Rowan Scarborough, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The U.S. Army War College, which molds future field generals, has begun discussing whether it should remove its portraits of Confederate generals - including those of Robert E. Lee and Thomas Stonewall Jackson.

Nestled in rural Pennsylvania on the 500-acre Carlisle Barracks, the war college is conducting an inventory of all its paintings and photographs with an eye for rehanging them in historical themes to tell a particular Army story.

During the inventory, an unidentified official - not the commandant, Maj. Gen. Anthony A. Cucolo III - asked the administration why the college honors two generals who fought against the United States, college spokeswoman Carol Kerr said.

I do know at least one person has questioned why we would honor individuals who were enemies of the United States Army, Ms. Kerr said. There will be a dialogue when we develop the idea of what do we want the hallway to represent.

She said one faculty member took down the portraits of Lee and Jackson and put them on the floor as part of the inventory process. That gave rise to rumors that the paintings had been removed.

This person was struck by the fact we have quite a few Confederate images, she said, adding that the portraits were rehung on a third-floor hallway. [Lee] was certainly not good for the nation. This is the guy we faced on the battlefield whose entire purpose in life was to destroy the nation as it was then conceived. ... This is all part of an informed discussion.

It is the kind of historical cleansing that could spark an Army-wide debate: Lee's portrait adorns the walls of other military installations and government buildings.

Two portraits of Lee are on display at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.: In the Cadet Mess Hall is a painting of Lee when he was superintendent as an Army captain. A portrait of Lee in full Confederate regalia hangs on the second floor of Jefferson Hall, the campus library.

Opened in 1901 to study the lessons of war, the Army War College is a history class and modern warfare symposium for lieutenant colonels and colonels who know that a diploma from the institution helps their chances with the promotion board. The college graduates more than 300 U.S. officers, foreign students and civilians in two classes each year. …

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