Romney Foes Excuse Obama's Health Act Waivers; Two Sides of Executive Power

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 30, 2013 | Go to article overview

Romney Foes Excuse Obama's Health Act Waivers; Two Sides of Executive Power


Byline: Tom Howell Jr., THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Little more than a year ago, the health care conversation was whether a potential President Mitt Romney could use executive powers to halt some or all of Obamacare. Now, it's President Obama himself who has made extensive use of those powers, leaving the GOP to accuse him and his defenders of hypocrisy.

In the year since his re-election, Mr. Obama has used his administrative chisel to chip away at deadlines and penalties tied to the law's individual mandate, arguing that he has the power to use his discretion to enforce parts and delay others.

Many of those who questioned whether Mr. Romney would have the authority are now defending Mr. Obama, saying he is within his rights because he is using his powers to defend, not pick apart, the Affordable Care Act.

It's hypocritical of the left, said Lanhee J. Chen, a policy adviser for the Romney campaign, noting that Democrats would have been up in arms if Romney had done the same thing as Obama.

Mr. Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee, guided state-level health care reform as Massachusetts governor but said Mr. Obama's nationwide model would not work as intended. He promised voters that if elected, he would issue a waiver on his first day in office granting states the power to opt out of the health care act. He said he then would use the budget process to choke off the law.

Pro-Obama groups accused Mr. Romney of misleading the American public by claiming executive powers that did not exist or could not repeal the health care law.

Since then, Mr. Obama has been the one carving out provisions. For instance, he said he would use the equivalent of prosecutorial discretion for states to allow substandard insurance policies that were supposed to be outlawed by Obamacare.

Mr. Romney's critics have become Mr. Obama's defenders, saying the intent of the two men matters.

I think there's just a huge difference between using executive discretion to implement a law properly and using executive discretion to repeal a law, said Timothy Jost, a health policy analyst at Washington and Lee University School of Law who criticized the Romney plan.

Igor Volsky, managing editor of Think Progress, wrote a pair of blog posts criticizing Mr. Romney during his candidacy for claims that he would let states opt out of Obamacare.

He said in an interview Friday that comparing Mr. Obama's tweaks to Mr. Romney's assertion of executive power does not stand because Mr. Romney would have flouted the will of Congress when it enacted a law intending to broaden access to health care.

[Mr. Obama is] using authority that administrations have used in years gone by for all kinds of things, Mr. …

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