Expanding Government Snoopery; A Federal Court OKs Unlimited Electronic Surveillance at Airports

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 3, 2014 | Go to article overview

Expanding Government Snoopery; A Federal Court OKs Unlimited Electronic Surveillance at Airports


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Anosy neighbor, gossip or voyeur looking for a job can look beyond a career at the National Security Agency. The federal government offers a wealth of opportunities for reading other people's mail. We've come a long way from the other extreme of foolishness, when a Cabinet officer once shut down a code-breaking program because gentlemen don't read each other's mail. But that was then. On New Year's Eve, a federal magistrate gave the Department of Homeland Security carte blanche to seize laptops and iPhones at the airport so they can read at leisure without going to the trouble of establishing cause to believe the devices were being used in the commission of a crime. No warrant needed.

If a passenger is taking the laptop on an international flight, decreed U.S. District Judge Edward R. Korman, that's reason enough to jettison the Fourth Amendment, which prohibits reading a citizen's papers and effects without a warrant. Such snooping, said Judge Korman, who was appointed to the court by President Reagan, is simply among the many inconveniences associated with international travel.

But life is not that simple where the rest of us live. Professional organizations of press photographers and criminal defense lawyers have a great deal at stake. They filed a lawsuit to put an end to such policies of the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) that empower agents to take laptops, cellphones, cameras, tape recorders and similar electronic devices. The agents can copy any photographs that catch their professional interest (or fancy), even download music files or movies and put it to use as the agent sees fit (or naughtily unfit, as the case may be). …

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Expanding Government Snoopery; A Federal Court OKs Unlimited Electronic Surveillance at Airports
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