Stephen Klein Wins Gold

State Legislatures, December 2013 | Go to article overview

Stephen Klein Wins Gold


Stephen Klein, director of the Vermont Joint Fiscal Office, is this year's recipient of the Steven D. Gold Award, which recognizes a person who has made a significant contribution to the field of state and local finance and intergovernmental relations.

Klein joined the staff of the Vermont Fiscal Office in 1992 and was appointed chief fiscal officer in 1993. The nonpartisan office of 12 full-time staff and three consultants provides fiscal analysis, budget evaluation, performance oversight and fiscal policy support for the General Assembly.

Working in state government has been a long-term interest of Klein's and the focus of his graduate work. Back in the '60s, unlike many of his peers during that tumultuous time, he felt government was critical for bringing about change.

Through his many years of professional and public service, Klein has earned the respect and admiration of his staff, members of the legislature, the community in which he lives and his colleagues from around the country. "Steve's extensive experience and depth of knowledge is an invaluable asset to Vermont," says Vermont Speaker Shap Smith (D). "He brings a level of energy, enthusiasm and creativity that is unusual in fiscal officers. I am proud to have Steve as a colleague and a friend."

Klein's staff describe him as an intelligent, fair, honest person with true compassion for others, a keen ability to find consensus and someone who is not afraid to laugh at himself.

"Nobody works harder for, or cares more deeply about, the Vermont General Assembly than Steve Klein," says Nathan Lavery, a fiscal analyst. "Steve combines an appreciation for the role of the institution with an equally genuine appreciation for the individuals who make it unique. I am constantly impressed by Steve's ability and willingness to meet the needs of legislators and staff alike. Steve has more than his share of enthusiasm, and he shares it freely."

Klein has served as president of the National Association of Legislative Fiscal Offices, and on NCSL's Executive Committee and the New England Public Policy Center's Advisory Board at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. …

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