Destination Unknown: Adventures of a WWII American Red Cross Girl

By Baltas, Janet Tudal | Air Power History, Winter 2013 | Go to article overview

Destination Unknown: Adventures of a WWII American Red Cross Girl


Baltas, Janet Tudal, Air Power History


Destination Unknown: Adventures of a WWII American Red Cross Girl. By LeOna and Kathleen Cox. CreateSpace Publishing, 2009. Photographs. Pp. 210. $12.82 paperback ISBN: 978-1466412484

My first thought on flipping through these scrapbook-like pages was that this was going to be a "fluff" piece with lots of photos. Wrong! While bookshelves are loaded with personal accounts of the horrific realities of battle, this book gives poignant insight into the state of mind of the American soldier on his way to, or coming back from, war. It is a treasure trove collection of more than 200 letters written by a 27-year-old teacher, LeOna Kriesel, who left a secure college teaching post in 1943 to become a Red Cross girl in North Africa and Europe.

Recruited by the Red Cross, LeOna passed a thorough FBI background check and was ordered to pack a footlocker with everything she would need for two years. She viewed this as the most exciting thing to happen in her life; her parents dreaded it. After several weeks of stateside training from how to play ping-pong and blackjack to properly donning a gas mask, LeOna sailed with 1,300 soldiers and 400 nurses and Red Cross workers to a foreign port known only to the ship's captain--Destination Unknown.

This book is loaded with photos and copies of LeOna's handwritten letters--most, thankfully, transcribed, and some juxtaposed with her handwritten letters on the opposite page. Interspersed throughout these typed letters are helpful explanations in bold font about who some of her subjects were, as well as current events to help the reader understand what was happening in the war and how her letters related to those events.

LeOna's letters bring the reader back to a bygone era of innocence. Few of us today would guess that the most popular form of entertainment overseas at Red Cross canteens was square dancing. And, yes, calling square dancing was another job a Red Cross girl had to know how to do. And those dances were packed!

For sixteen months LeOna's detailed letters regaled her parents with anecdotes of how she and her fellow Red Cross workers helped thousands of American soldiers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Destination Unknown: Adventures of a WWII American Red Cross Girl
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.