Cohen, Yoel. God, Jews, and the Media: Religion and Israel's Media

By Soukup, Paul A. | Communication Research Trends, December 2013 | Go to article overview

Cohen, Yoel. God, Jews, and the Media: Religion and Israel's Media


Soukup, Paul A., Communication Research Trends


Cohen, Yoel. God, Jews, and the Media: Religion and Israel's Media. London and New York: Routledge, 2012. Pp. xiv, 258. ISBN 978-0-415-47503-7 (cloth) $140.00; 978-0-203-12334-8 (e-Book) $135.00.

Along with so many other reasons, Israel stands distinct among nations for its close association between government and religion, an association that overflows into the media. The role of religious parties in parliament accounts for some of this, but the general role of religion in society plays a role as well. The fact that religious Israelis fall into two main groups--the modern orthodox and the ultra-orthodox (and their subgroupings)--adds to the complexity. Not surprisingly, these divisions of society appear in the media practices of the people and the state. News, for example, comes from both a religious press and a less religious one; rabbinical authorities counsel or command people regarding their Internet use and, for the more conservative, offer binding opinions regarding how Sabbath observance affects their television use. Even advertising observes religious boundaries.

Yoel Cohen offers a carefully researched and well thought out guide to media in Israel. He combines treatments of the various media with descriptions of Israeli life and explanations of the continuum of religious practice. The situation can become complex indeed, as when the Haredim (the most conservative religious group), having achieved a victory in censoring bus advertising, sought to prevent a political party from promoting a female candidate by placing her picture on bus posters (p. 159), a move eventually blocked by the courts.

Cohen introduces the reader to the complexities of the situation with two chapters of overview: the first, "Media, Judaism, and Culture," places the study within general media and religion studies; the second, "The Jewish Theory of Communication," offers a religious background on the roles that language, speech, and communication play in Judaism and how these biblically-derived ideas have grown into a communication theory that governs everything from modesty to reputation to e-commerce. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cohen, Yoel. God, Jews, and the Media: Religion and Israel's Media
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.