EWC President a Great Man, Scholar

By Hollinger, Delaitre Jordan | The Florida Times Union, December 14, 2013 | Go to article overview

EWC President a Great Man, Scholar


Hollinger, Delaitre Jordan, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Delaitre Jordan Hollinger

A few months ago, I was sifting through a booklet of family history.

I discovered that I was the great-great nephew of Dock Jackson Jordan, one of the most fearless, accomplished and visionary leaders of his time.

He was born Oct. 18, 1866 in Cuthbert, Ga., to former slaves Giles and Julia Jordan. Giles Jordan was my great-greatgrandfather.

He was a prominent circuit rider and well-known minister in the AME church for more than 25 years.

Dock Jordan attended Payne High School in Cuthbert, graduated from Allen University and was admitted to practice law by the South Carolina Supreme Court.

He also received B.A. and A.M. degrees from Columbia University.

Jordan joined the faculty of Morris Brown College (then University) and served as professor of Science and Dean of Law for some two years. He was then named president of Edward Waters College in Jacksonville.

A LEADER IN EVERY WAY

According to the book "Who's Who on the Colored Race (1915)," Jordan was the Republican nominee for the state legislature in Randolph County, Ga. and a delegate to the state convention.

It was there that he gave a 10-minute speech resulting in the defeat of white supremacist Tom Watson as a candidate for governor of Georgia.

Jordan also served as a lay delegate for the AME Church.

Jordan also served as Morris Brown's vice president and professor of literature and mathematics as well as a public school principal in Atlanta.

In addition, he served as president of a state teachers association and taught math at Clark University. And he also served as a professor at Shorter College (Arkansas) and president of Kittrell College (North Carolina), among other top positions.

Jordan's national prominence rose in the aftermath of the 1917 race riots in East St. …

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